Religion

Religious perspectives on human biotechnologies vary widely, depending in part on the specific technology or application. Most religious leaders are in step with public sentiment in opposing human inheritable genetic modification and reproductive cloning, and recognize social and ethical as well as theological objections to them. In 1983, a coalition of U.S. religious leaders issued a letter to Congress calling for a ban on inheritable genetic modification. Religious communities are more divided about research involving human embryos, with many conservative Christian denominations opposing embryonic stem cell research. Communities of faith may ground their approach to human biotechnologies in theological beliefs, but their concerns also shed important light on the potential for human biotechnologies to redefine our understandings of life itself.


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In 1951, Henrietta Lacks walked into Johns Hopkins Hospital complaining of vaginal bleeding. Although she died later that year, her legacy lives on. Why? Because researchers took her cells and shared them with colleagues, conducting countless studies that have fueled...

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For nine frustrating years, Lesley and John Brown tried to conceive a child but failed because of her blocked fallopian tubes. Then in late 1977, this English couple put their hopes in the hands of two men of science. Thus...

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Sometimes it seems there are so many ways to destroy women that the methods become invisible to us. There are...

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A new advanced test for Down’s syndrome to be offered to pregnant women this year raises the prospect of people...

A person's left hand grips a piece of paper, and their right hand holds a pencil positioned as if they are writing.

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Protesters hold a yellow sign that reads, "race to the bottom??"

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Black and white graphic displaying DNA strands within tubes that are lined up.

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A purple gloved hand holds two mice.

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Several black chess pieces are positioned side by side, standing upright.

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An illustration of a spiraling clock displaying roman numerals that circulate.

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