CGS encourages responsible uses and effecitve governance of human genetic and assisted reproductive technologies

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Press Statement

In a statement released today, more than 100 civil society organizations, public interest advocates, scholars, health practitioners, scientists, and others call on the organizers of the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing to clearly condemn the actions of researcher...

Op-Ed

The fierce global controversy over whether to alter the genes of future children and generations just got fiercer. On the eve of a high-profile scientific meeting in Hong Kong on human gene editing, the Chinese researcher and biotech entrepreneur He...

Aggregated News

This is the experiment that was not supposed to happen.
Press Statement

Chinese scientist Jiankui He has announced the birth of twin girls whose DNA he claims to have altered using the...

Biopolitical Times

The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing was held in Hong Kong on November 27–29. It was the sequel...

Private Life, the latest offering from Netflix, peels back the layers on the human quest for genetically related children....

In her new memoir, Becoming, Michelle Obama makes a brave choice: she reveals her experience of a miscarriage and...

News

By Jing-Bao Nie, Neil Pickering, The Hasting's Center | 12.13.2018

When the world’s first research on editing the genes of human embryos by Chinese scientists  was published in an international journal in 2015, a report in the New York Timescharacterised the key issue involved as “a scientific ethical divide...

By Rob Stein, NPR [Cites CGS' Marcy Darnovsky] | 12.13.2018

Three of the most influential scientific organizations in the world are calling for an urgent international effort to prevent scientists from creating any more gene-edited babies without proper approval and supervision.

Global standards are needed quickly to ensure gene-editing of...

By Ellen Wright Clayton, Nature | 12.12.2018

The year is 2030. Gene therapy to insert the DNA sequence for dystrophin has been approved by regulators and is commonly used in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a disorder linked to the X chromosome. Evidence shows that the...

By David Cyranoski, Scientific American | 12.12.2018

Chinese scientist He Jiankui’s extraordinary claim two weeks ago that he had helped to make the first babies—twin girls—with edited genomes shocked the world. Many questions remain about the experiments, but among researchers’ chief concerns are the potential effects...

Video

Controversial Gene Editing Physicist Missing
Chinese Researcher Claims to Have Genetically Edited Babies
Where the Debate Over "Designer Babies" Began