Media Coverage

Magazine covers, front-page newspaper articles, social media are often the first point of contact for the public on emerging human biotechnologies. Consequently, it’s important to address how media coverage shapes public perceptions of the latest scientific innovations. While many articles celebrate new techniques as “breakthroughs” or “medical miracles,” they may not address whether the results are preliminary or have been subjected to peer review, what risks they entail, or what their social or policy consequences might be. Journalists have a responsibility to be both skeptical and accurate, so the public can take part in a well-informed debate.


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Genetic-ancestry tests are having a moment. Look no further than Spotify: On Thursday, the music-streaming service—as in, the service used to fill tedious workdays and DJ parties—launched a collaboration with AncestryDNA. The partnership creates custom playlists for users based...

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On May 18, W. French Anderson, known as the “father of gene therapy,” was released from prison on parole. Two weeks later, the 81-year-old scientist, pediatrician, and ex-con welcomed science writer Sharon Begley to his home in California for several...

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In 2004, Voters approved Proposition 71 by nearly 60 percent establishing a $3 billion bond to fund the science of...

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When you send your saliva to 23andme, you can get all kinds of genetic information — but now that it's...

Biopolitical Times
Elizabeth Warren speaking at a podium

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Biopolitical Times