Media Coverage

Magazine covers, front-page newspaper articles, social media are often the first point of contact for the public on emerging human biotechnologies. Consequently, it’s important to address how media coverage shapes public perceptions of the latest scientific innovations. While many articles celebrate new techniques as “breakthroughs” or “medical miracles,” they may not address whether the results are preliminary or have been subjected to peer review, what risks they entail, or what their social or policy consequences might be. Journalists have a responsibility to be both skeptical and accurate, so the public can take part in a well-informed debate.


Biopolitical Times

What might have been the story of the year turned out to be a disappointment. On February 14th, the National Academies delivered a valentine to those who want to commit germline gene editing. Its much anticipated report, Human Genome Editing: Science, Ethics, and Governance concluded that scientists should “proceed with caution.” This was the first time that human germline modification has ever been given a green light by a comparable body – the U.S. National Academies is an influential non-governmental...

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It seems hard to fathom that scientific progress has advanced to a point where it’s suddenly possible for people to undertake something as complicated as gene therapy outside the safety and confines of a well-funded lab, but it has. In...

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The revolutionary gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 is best known for helping scientists edit a strand of DNA more precisely and...

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How a powerful group of New Zealanders attempted to wipe out 'mental defectives' and improve the white race.

Oh Mother,...

Scanning electromicrograph of an HIV-infected T cell

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A book lies open, with a judge's gavel resting on top.

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