Other Countries

Countries differ widely in the ways they regulate human biotechnologies, in the practices and products their policies cover, and in the nature of enforcement. A few countries, most notably the UK, have established agencies responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. Many countries have prohibited the most troubling applications of human biotechnology. Heritable genome editing, for example, is categorically prohibited in 70 nations.


Biopolitical Times
On Sunday, January 31, 60 Minutes featured DNA databases and China — together and separately — in fine, bombastic style.
Biopolitical Times

Photo by Michael on Unsplash

The Australian government is currently considering legalizing “mitochondrial donation,” also known as “3-person IVF.” Australian law currently prohibits creating embryos using DNA from more than two people. The prohibition is found in the same law that prohibits modifying genomes that will be passed on to future generations (heritable genome editing or germline modification). Australia is one of more than 70 countries globally, including Canada, Germany, and France, that prohibit germline modifications on embryos...

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Canadian bioethicists and genetics experts are speaking out against Denis Rebrikov, the Russian molecular biologist who plans — in defiance...

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The babies lie in cribs, sleeping, crying or smiling at nurses, swaddled in clean linens and apparently well cared for...

5 heads of cattle

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IVF

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Gloved hand drawing blood from a baby's foot

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Baby crawling within a DNA helix

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an egg being artificially inseminated

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an egg cell with a question mark inside

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jumbled, mismatched puzzle pieces

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silhouette of a seated man with trees in background

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