Other Countries

Countries differ widely in the ways they regulate human biotechnologies, including the practices and products their policies cover, the jurisdiction of authority, and the nature of enforcement. A few, most notably the U.K., have established agencies responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. In addition, many countries have prohibited the most troubling applications of human biotechnology: inheritable human genetic modification and human reproductive cloning. To date, they are illegal in over 40 countries.
Biopolitical Times

In 2004, Canada passed the Assisted Human Reproduction (AHR) Act, establishing an important piece of national legislation on assisted reproductive technologies. The AHR Act was significant in part due to the unique nature of its consultation process, in which a wide range of voices offered input, including feminist scholars, women’s health advocates, and civil society organizations. The resulting AHR Act includes a comprehensive regulatory framework that addressed a range of health, safety, and ethical issues related to reproductive technologies...

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“What we’ve got here is some DNA, and this is a syringe,” Josiah Zayner tells a room full of synthetic biologists and other researchers. He fills the needle and plunges it into his skin. “This will modify my muscle genes...

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For several years, scientists have experimented on human embryos with a powerful genome editing tool called CRISPR to see if...

Biopolitical Times

There are few things South Asians love more than movies. While we are prone to agitate in most situations, I...

Block letters ATCG are positioned in a line, wtih one of the A letters in front, appearing to be erased.

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A male doctor examines a pregnant woman's exposed stomach as she lays does on a hospital bed.

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Illustration of an 8-cell stage embryo

Op-Ed