Other Countries

Countries differ widely in the ways they regulate human biotechnologies, including the practices and products their policies cover, the jurisdiction of authority, and the nature of enforcement. A few, most notably the U.K., have established agencies responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. In addition, many countries have prohibited the most troubling applications of human biotechnology: inheritable human genetic modification and human reproductive cloning. To date, they are illegal in over 40 countries.

Op-Ed

A startup called Darwin Life says it will use a controversial fertility technique to help forty-somethings get pregnant for $100,000.

A U.S. fertility doctor has started a company with a provocative vision for older women: become pregnant by having their DNA...

Biopolitical Times

The Center for Genetics and Society’s (CGS) Program Manager and ACLS/Mellon Public Fellow, Leah Lowthorp, recently traveled to India to speak on ethics and legislation related to the prospect of using germline editing for human reproduction. She gave two talks in Bangalore, the biotech hub of India. The first of these was for the Takshashila public policy institute, a respected think tank; the second was for the Law and Technology Society of the National Law School, one of India’s premier...

Aggregated News

The risks from home-based genetic testing kits to privacy as well as people’s health appear far greater than the supposed

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Aggregated News

In 1992, Congress passed a law to help protect in vitro fertilization patients after a series of scandals. It created...

Aggregated News

Aggregated News

Aggregated News