Religion

Religious perspectives on human biotechnologies vary widely, depending in part on the specific technology or application. Most religious leaders are in step with public sentiment in opposing human inheritable genetic modification and reproductive cloning, and recognize social and ethical as well as theological objections to them. In 1983, a coalition of U.S. religious leaders issued a letter to Congress calling for a ban on inheritable genetic modification. Religious communities are more divided about research involving human embryos, with many conservative Christian denominations opposing embryonic stem cell research. Communities of faith may ground their approach to human biotechnologies in theological beliefs, but their concerns also shed important light on the potential for human biotechnologies to redefine our understandings of life itself.


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A new advanced test for Down’s syndrome to be offered to pregnant women this year raises the prospect of people with the condition disappearing from UK society as terminations are expected to rise, the Church of England has warned.

Non-invasive...

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Public dialogue about the new technology will require major investments from scientists, journalists, and philanthropists.

In 2014 biochemist Jennifer Doudna of the University of California at Berkeley awoke from a nightmare that would shift the focus of her world-class scientific...

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What “Frankenstein” and the golem tell us about the power and responsibility of science.

January 1 marks the 200th anniversary of...

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Emma Wren Gibson, frozen as an embryo in 1992, was born a few days after Thanksgiving in 2017, more than...

An illustration of a spiraling clock displaying roman numerals that circulate.

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Black and white photo of human skull.

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Three empty hospital beds are shown in a dimly lit room.

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