Religion

Religious perspectives on human biotechnologies vary widely, depending in part on the specific technology or application. Most religious leaders are in step with public sentiment in opposing human inheritable genetic modification and reproductive cloning, and recognize social and ethical as well as theological objections to them. In 1983, a coalition of U.S. religious leaders issued a letter to Congress calling for a ban on inheritable genetic modification. Religious communities are more divided about research involving human embryos, with many conservative Christian denominations opposing embryonic stem cell research. Communities of faith may ground their approach to human biotechnologies in theological beliefs, but their concerns also shed important light on the potential for human biotechnologies to redefine our understandings of life itself.


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Should there be a religious or moral litmus test for the NIH Director?

A few dozen super conservative Republican members of Congress have written a letter to President Trump saying he should fire NIH Director Francis Collins.

Why?

Because they...

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China appears to be laying the groundwork for the mass collection of DNA samples from residents of a restive, largely Muslim region that's been under a security crackdown, rights observers and independent experts said Tuesday.

Police in western China's Xinjiang...

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Nearly 40 years after the world was jolted by the birth of the first test-tube baby, a new revolution in...

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BIOLOGY HAS EMERGED as one of the most important technology platforms of the 21st century. With the arrival of the gene-editing...

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