Religion

Religious perspectives on human biotechnologies vary widely, depending in part on the specific technology or application. Most religious leaders are in step with public sentiment in opposing human inheritable genetic modification and reproductive cloning, and recognize social and ethical as well as theological objections to them. In 1983, a coalition of U.S. religious leaders issued a letter to Congress calling for a ban on inheritable genetic modification. Religious communities are more divided about research involving human embryos, with many conservative Christian denominations opposing embryonic stem cell research. Communities of faith may ground their approach to human biotechnologies in theological beliefs, but their concerns also shed important light on the potential for human biotechnologies to redefine our understandings of life itself.


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About two-thirds of Americans support the use of gene editing to treat diseases, according to a new survey. But opinions vary a lot based on people’s religious beliefs and how much they know about gene editing in general.

The research, ...

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Unless we pay much more attention to ethical and social choices, we risk turning the promise of gene editing into disaster.

In a breakthrough announced Wednesday, scientists successfully edited the genes of a human embryo to eliminate a dangerous gene...

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Should there be a religious or moral litmus test for the NIH Director?

A few dozen super conservative Republican members...

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China appears to be laying the groundwork for the mass collection of DNA samples from residents of a restive, largely...

A purple gloved hand holds two mice.

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Several black chess pieces are positioned side by side, standing upright.

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An illustration of a spiraling clock displaying roman numerals that circulate.

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