U.S. Federal

In comparison to many other nations, the U.S. has few federal laws specifically addressing human genetic technologies. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), which prohibits the use of individuals’ genetic information in employment and health insurance, is an exception. Similarly, while many countries have established legislation about aspects of assisted reproduction, the only federal U.S. law is the 1992 Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act, which requires fertility clinics to report standardized success rate data to the Centers for Disease Control. Unlike dozens of other countries with advanced biotech sectors, the U.S. has no federal laws regulating human reproductive cloning or inheritable genetic modification. However, the FDA has asserted authority over practices including human reproductive cloning, “three-person IVF,” and inheritable genetic modification; the National Institutes of Health makes decisions about research funding; and Congress has exerted some control over research involving human embryos through budget riders.

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A report from the National Academies says scientists alone can't make the call—they must engage with the broader public

Meaningful public debate seems almost impossible in an era of political bubbles isolating us one from another and facts becoming a...

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Sangamo Therapeutics will use zinc finger nucleases to introduce the gene for a missing clotting factor into the livers of men with hemophilia B.

Researchers have edited the human genome before, but always in cells outside the body. Now, biotech...

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DNA is what makes us who we are. In humans, our genetic makeup is 99.9 percent similar to the person...

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He made the emotional plea to his colleagues: Pass this bill.

“It might give somebody like my wife a chance...

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