Other Countries

Countries differ widely in the ways they regulate human biotechnologies, including the practices and products their policies cover, the jurisdiction of authority, and the nature of enforcement. A few, most notably the U.K., have established agencies responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. In addition, many countries have prohibited the most troubling applications of human biotechnology: inheritable human genetic modification and human reproductive cloning. To date, they are illegal in over 40 countries.

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As the genomics revolution finally turns its attention to Africa and northern researchers flock there to collect data, scientists from the continent are demanding a larger role in projects.

On 18 April, a group of Africa-based researchers issued guidelines for...

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SINGAPORE: The Bioethics Advisory Committee (BAC) is reviewing its current stand against genetic modification with regards to genetic disorders passed on to children by their mothers. 

The committee, set up by the Government to deal with issues arising from biomedical...

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A Chinese baby was born by a surrogate mother four years after his parents were killed in a car accident.

Parents...

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People hoping to be parents in the UK are being sold “false hope” by foreign IVF clinics claiming success rates...

Picture of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Bright yellow fluorescent fish in water

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Indian Flag

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Burj Al Arab at sunset in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

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A little girl holds adults hands as they balance walking.

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Several video surveillance cameras are lined up in different angles on a wall

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Pregnant Chinese woman lying down

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