Global Governance

Global governance of human biotechnologies refers to agreements among nations, and to statements and policies issued by international organizations. The most authoritative international agreement to date is the Council of Europe’s 1997 Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, a binding treaty that bans inheritable genetic modification and human reproductive cloning. UNESCO, the European Parliament, the Group of Eight industrial nations, the World Health Assembly, and the United Nations have also issued declarations or statements about human biotechnologies, particularly on human reproductive cloning.

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For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that a controversial new kind of genetic engineering can rapidly spread a self-destructive genetic modification through a complex species.

The scientists used the revolutionary gene-editing tool known as CRISPR to engineer mosquitoes with...

Op-Ed

A wave of controversy about reproductive gene editing gathered force in response to reports in 2015 of the first CRISPR experiments on human embryos. That news provoked two kinds of reactions: on the one hand, hyperbolic claims about "editing humanity"...

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The Nuffield Council on Bioethics’ recent endorsement of human genome editing has drawn fire from experts – including at least...

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When scientists discover a new way to prevent disease or overcome infertility, they usually get applauded. But throw genetic engineering...

Mosquito on skin

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White pencil made out of a strand of DNA, on a blue background

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US patent seal

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Biopolitical Times
Six steps of cell division

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Mosquito standing on leaf/green background

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A black and white illustration shows Dr. Frankenstein in a lab with a partially assembled skeleton on the table

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