Other Countries

Countries differ widely in the ways they regulate human biotechnologies, including the practices and products their policies cover, the jurisdiction of authority, and the nature of enforcement. A few, most notably the U.K., have established agencies responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. In addition, many countries have prohibited the most troubling applications of human biotechnology: inheritable human genetic modification and human reproductive cloning. To date, they are illegal in over 40 countries.
Biopolitical Times

As we learned last Friday, the UK’s Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has given Newcastle Fertility Centre the green light to create embryos using 3-person IVF techniques and implant them in two women affected by mitochondrial disease. The aim is to create children that are unaffected by mitochondrial disease, yet fully genetically related to both parents. While pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is successful in preventing the transmission of mitochondrial disease in most cases, these two cases were deemed exceptions....

Aggregated News

Ever since DNA was first used in 1986 to catch a killer, it's swashbuckled its way through society as an almost infallible weapon of truth: convicting the guilty, freeing the innocent, revealing bloodlines, paternity and identity.

On the health front, even before it...

Aggregated News

Doctors in Newcastle have been granted permission to create Britain’s first “three-person babies” for two women who are at risk...

Aggregated News

For centuries, people have drawn the line between nature and nurture.

In the nineteenth century, the English polymath Francis Galton...