Arts & Culture

Art and culture can have a profound influence in shaping public opinion and policy decisions about biotechnologies. From Aldous Huxley’s classic 1932 novel Brave New World to films like GATTACA and TV shows like Orphan Black, popular culture profoundly influences how we understand the potential impacts of emerging biotechnologies. Scholars have even created terms like the “CSI effect,” which refers to how crime show story lines make the public overly confident about the accuracy of DNA as a forensic tool. In general, works of art and pop culture can provide important insights into the risk that unreflectively embracing new technologies can exacerbate existing inequalities.


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Genetic-ancestry tests are having a moment. Look no further than Spotify: On Thursday, the music-streaming service—as in, the service used to fill tedious workdays and DJ parties—launched a collaboration with AncestryDNA. The partnership creates custom playlists for users based...

Biopolitical Times

It’s time again for the one sporting event that has literally stopped wars. Beginning on June 14, the World Cup will consume roughly half the world’s population for an entire month. For fans of the game, it will be like waking up on Christmas morning every day. And if you’re in one of the 32 countries whose national team is lucky enough to participate out of the 208 countries who strive to be there, the World Cup is an obsession...

Biopolitical Times

The explosion of reality television has dramatically altered how we think about celebrities, everyday life, and the boundary between the...

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On May 18, W. French Anderson, known as the “father of gene therapy,” was released from prison on parole. Two...

Biopolitical Times
Red and yellow musical symbols on red background

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Image taken from the front of a lecture hall facing the empty seats.

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Biopolitical Times
Biopolitical Times
Cartoon image of a bearded man in button down shirt with a surprised expression on his face. He is pointing over his shoulder at a colorful pie chart.

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