Arts & Culture

Art and culture can have a profound influence in shaping public opinion and policy decisions about biotechnologies. From Aldous Huxley’s classic 1932 novel Brave New World to films like GATTACA and TV shows like Orphan Black, popular culture profoundly influences how we understand the potential impacts of emerging biotechnologies. Scholars have even created terms like the “CSI effect,” which refers to how crime show story lines make the public overly confident about the accuracy of DNA as a forensic tool. In general, works of art and pop culture can provide important insights into the risk that unreflectively embracing new technologies can exacerbate existing inequalities.


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Genetic-ancestry tests are having a moment. Look no further than Spotify: On Thursday, the music-streaming service—as in, the service used to fill tedious workdays and DJ parties—launched a collaboration with AncestryDNA. The partnership creates custom playlists for users based...

Biopolitical Times

A perk of being a scholar focused on reproductive technology is that I can justify watching terrible movies as research. That was the excuse that I used when I watched the film Rampage starring Dwayne Johnson as Davis Okoye, a primatologist and former soldier in the U.S. Special Forces.

Rampage is a monster movie about genetically mutated animals who wreak havoc on Chicago. Only the herculean efforts of Okoye and the mutated albino gorilla, George, can save the city and...

Biopolitical Times

The explosion of reality television has dramatically altered how we think about celebrities, everyday life, and the boundary between the...

Biopolitical Times

It’s time again for the one sporting event that has literally stopped wars. Beginning on June 14, the World Cup...

Biopolitical Times
Red and yellow musical symbols on red background

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Image taken from the front of a lecture hall facing the empty seats.

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Biopolitical Times