Arts & Culture

Art and culture can have a profound influence in shaping public opinion and policy decisions about biotechnologies. From Aldous Huxley’s classic 1932 novel Brave New World to films like GATTACA and TV shows like Orphan Black, popular culture profoundly influences how we understand the potential impacts of emerging biotechnologies. Scholars have even created terms like the “CSI effect,” which refers to how crime show story lines make the public overly confident about the accuracy of DNA as a forensic tool. In general, works of art and pop culture can provide important insights into the risk that unreflectively embracing new technologies can exacerbate existing inequalities.


Biopolitical Times

Babies of Technology: Assisted Reproduction and the Rights of the Child, by Mary Ann Mason and Tom Ekman, 240 pp. Yale University Press, 2017.

The preponderance of books on the assisted reproductive industry focus on the desires, experiences, and rights, loosely or legally defined, of would-be parents. In Babies of Technology: Assisted Reproduction and the Rights of the Child, authors Mary Ann Mason and Tom Ekman opt instead to survey the field from the perspective of children’s rights,...

Aggregated News

Scientists are trying to manufacture eggs and sperm in the laboratory. Will it end reproduction as we know it?

Let’s call him B.D., because that’s what his wife does on her infertility blog, Shooting Blanks. Several years ago, the 36-year-old...

Biopolitical Times

With research involving gene editing of embryos now officially underway in the US, and the apparent ability to genetically alter...

Aggregated News

Last month, researchers in Oregon broke new scientific ground when they used CRISPR/Cas-9 to genetically modify human embryos, a first...