U.S. States

Individual states have passed differing laws regarding human biotechnologies, creating an often inconsistent policy patchwork across the country. This is particularly the case with regard to human reproductive cloning, embryo cloning for stem cell research, and surrogacy. While more than a dozen states prohibit human reproductive cloning, the rest have not addressed it in law. Several states prohibit the creation of cloned human embryos for stem cell research, while others – notably California, which prohibits reproductive cloning – have invested billions of dollars in stem cell research programs that fund it. Laws and regulations pertaining to assisted reproduction, especially surrogacy, also vary significantly from state to state.

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Police departments around the country are getting increasingly comfortable using DNA from non-criminal databases in the pursuit of criminal cases. On Tuesday, investigators in North and South Carolina announced that a public genealogy website had helped them identify two bodies found decades...

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In case you haven’t noticed, stem cell clinics are popping up everywhere. There are hundreds across the country, especially in California. The clinics peddle “vegan stem cell facials” or “stem cell vaginal rejuvenations” and claim the miracle cells can...

Biopolitical Times

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has now spent almost all of the $3 billion of public funds (which...

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If you think clandestine DNA dragnets and secret databases are things of science fiction, I have some upsetting news.

From...

Stem cells under microscope dyed blue

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Bensalem police car parked in front of fence

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researches removes DNA from a test tube.

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A row of test tubes in a plastic holder

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A medic holding a test tube with blood in it.

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Blue double stranded DNA helix on light blue background

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Pipet in a test tube

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Biopolitical Times