Racial Justice

Most scientists and social scientists agree that there is no biological basis for race. Yet the idea that racial groups can be found in biology continues to make its way into human genetic research and biotechnologies. Some common examples include genetic studies on racialized health disparities, direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry tests, and forensic DNA databases. These products and practices typically try to reduce race to a set of biological markers, and fail to address the social, political, environmental, and economic inequalities that continue to make race a salient social category. Critical race scholars and racial justice advocates alike seek to promote public awareness and regulatory oversight of biotechnology to ensure that genetics isn’t used to exploit or reinforce existing institutional racial inequalities.


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Tribal leaders are developing a policy for genetic research and data sharing, potentially ending a 15-year moratorium.

When the Navajo Nation opens its first oncology centre next year in Tuba City, Arizona, clinicians there may be able to offer a...

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Is President Donald Trump a fan of eugenics? He seems to believe that he comes from greatly superior genetic stock.

He hasn’t said much of anything about CRISPR ‘gene editing’ technology that can readily alter the genetic code of cells...

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Four crucial facts about race, sex, and biology that contradict this messy argument.

In America, we've had a long history...

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The Legal Aid Society launched a broadside Monday at the state’s familial DNA testing proposal, saying the move is an...