Racial Justice

Most scientists and social scientists agree that there is no biological basis for race. Yet the idea that racial groups can be found in biology continues to make its way into human genetic research and biotechnologies. Some common examples include genetic studies on racialized health disparities, direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry tests, and forensic DNA databases. These products and practices typically try to reduce race to a set of biological markers, and fail to address the social, political, environmental, and economic inequalities that continue to make race a salient social category. Critical race scholars and racial justice advocates alike seek to promote public awareness and regulatory oversight of biotechnology to ensure that genetics isn’t used to exploit or reinforce existing institutional racial inequalities.


Biopolitical Times
The use of modern genetics as a prop for centuries-old racist biases continues despite the best efforts of most scientists. As a native Londoner whose parents were born in India, Angela Saini is acutely aware of prejudice.

Aggregated News

Law, Africana-studies, and sociology professor Dorothy Roberts describes race as a “political category that has been disguised as a biological one.” It’s a hard concept for many to grasp. Physical features associated with race, such as skin and hair color,...

Aggregated News

At the turn of the 20th century, U.S. scientists proposed the control of reproduction to advance society based on the...

Aggregated News

When Karina Vetrano was found beaten and strangled in a Queens park nearly three years ago, the New York Police...