Racial Justice

Most scientists and social scientists agree that there is no biological basis for race. Yet the idea that racial groups can be found in biology continues to make its way into human genetic research and biotechnologies. Some common examples include genetic studies on racialized health disparities, direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry tests, and forensic DNA databases. These products and practices typically try to reduce race to a set of biological markers, and fail to address the social, political, environmental, and economic inequalities that continue to make race a salient social category. Critical race scholars and racial justice advocates alike seek to promote public awareness and regulatory oversight of biotechnology to ensure that genetics isn’t used to exploit or reinforce existing institutional racial inequalities.


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A state commission voted this morning to adopt a controversial policy allowing police to perform familial DNA searches in certain criminal cases.

The 9-2 vote by the state Commission on Forensic Science lets cops investigating cases that pose a public...

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Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws banning interracial marriage, but the issues involved in the case extended beyond its current popular understanding as a tribute to romance.

Interracial marriage is at a historic high. According...

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A special state committee Friday approved a recommendation that New York State adopt the use of familial searching, an emerging...

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China appears to be laying the groundwork for the mass collection of DNA samples from residents of a restive, largely...

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