Racial Justice

Most scientists and social scientists agree that there is no biological basis for race. Yet the idea that racial groups can be found in biology continues to make its way into human genetic research and biotechnologies. Some common examples include genetic studies on racialized health disparities, direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry tests, and forensic DNA databases. These products and practices typically try to reduce race to a set of biological markers, and fail to address the social, political, environmental, and economic inequalities that continue to make race a salient social category. Critical race scholars and racial justice advocates alike seek to promote public awareness and regulatory oversight of biotechnology to ensure that genetics isn’t used to exploit or reinforce existing institutional racial inequalities.


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It was a strange moment of triumph against racism: The gun-slinging white supremacist Craig Cobb, dressed up for daytime TV in a dark suit and red tie, hearing that his DNA testing revealed his ancestry to be only “86 percent...

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Today in America, if you are poor, you are also more likely to suffer from poor health. Low socioeconomic status—and the lack of access to healthcare that often accompanies it—has been tied to mental illnessobesityheart disease...

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Hundreds of black men were tricked into volunteering as human guinea pigs. For 40 years, no one stepped in to...

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In a new book, University of North Carolina, Charlotte anthropologist Jonathan Marks says that racism in science is alive and...