Racial Justice

Most scientists and social scientists agree that there is no biological basis for race. Yet the idea that racial groups can be found in biology continues to make its way into human genetic research and biotechnologies. Some common examples include genetic studies on racialized health disparities, direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry tests, and forensic DNA databases. These products and practices typically try to reduce race to a set of biological markers, and fail to address the social, political, environmental, and economic inequalities that continue to make race a salient social category. Critical race scholars and racial justice advocates alike seek to promote public awareness and regulatory oversight of biotechnology to ensure that genetics isn’t used to exploit or reinforce existing institutional racial inequalities.


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China appears to be laying the groundwork for the mass collection of DNA samples from residents of a restive, largely Muslim region that's been under a security crackdown, rights observers and independent experts said Tuesday.

Police in western China's Xinjiang...

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When the first busloads of migrants from Syria and Iraq rolled into Germany 2 years ago, some small towns were overwhelmed. The village of Sumte, population 102, had to take in 750 asylum seekers. Most villagers swung into action, in...

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TUSKEGEE, Ala. — Decades later, it’s still hard to grasp what the federal government did to hundreds of black men...

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This article is part of the series Evil Infrastructures.

What happens when white supremacists take genetic ancestry tests (GAT)?...

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Biopolitical Times

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