Biopolitics

Biopolitics refers to public understandings, public policies, and public-interest advocacy about the social meanings and consequences of human biotechnologies. Biopolitics in the 21st century has come to reflect the rapid acceleration of technological developments since the birth of the modern biotechnology industry in the 1970s, the increasingly blurred boundary between academic and commercial biology, and growing recognition of the need for public and political engagement, especially with profoundly consequential prospects including human gene editing for reproduction. In some countries, notably the U.S., biopolitical views are not always aligned with political positioning on other issues. Public interest advocates working in a biopolitical framework emphasize the importance of social justice to evaluations of technological innovations.


Aggregated News

Ever since DNA was first used in 1986 to catch a killer, it's swashbuckled its way through society as an almost infallible weapon of truth: convicting the guilty, freeing the innocent, revealing bloodlines, paternity and identity.

On the health front, even before it...

Aggregated News

Toxic effects seen in animals raise questions about new gene therapies for children.

An influential scientist involved in gene therapy’s biggest setback, the death of a study volunteer 19 years ago, has issued a surprise warning over the dangers...

Op-Ed

Remember the human cloning controversies of the early 2000s? One reason they faded was that scientists were unable to...

Aggregated News

A Chinese woman surnamed Lin who paid 450,000 yuan ($69,200) for a baby delivered by a surrogate Cambodian mother now...