Media Coverage

Magazine covers, front-page newspaper articles, social media are often the first point of contact for the public on emerging human biotechnologies. Consequently, it’s important to address how media coverage shapes public perceptions of the latest scientific innovations. While many articles celebrate new techniques as “breakthroughs” or “medical miracles,” they may not address whether the results are preliminary or have been subjected to peer review, what risks they entail, or what their social or policy consequences might be. Journalists have a responsibility to be both skeptical and accurate, so the public can take part in a well-informed debate.


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Let’s Not Distort Debates about Human Cloning and Heritable Gene Editing

Cloning is back in the headlines. Researchers managed to create two macaque monkeys by cloning, and immediately there was talk about using the Dolly-the-sheep technique to create human clones....

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It can feel shocking when someone disparages a golden person, thing or technology -- and in recent years, no emerging technology has glittered as brightly as the gene-altering technique known as Crispr. So some investors were apparently jolted earlier this...

Op-Ed

“I want to democratize science,” says biohacker extraordinaire Josiah Zayner.

This is certainly a worthy-sounding sentiment. And it is central...

Op-Ed

When we talk about gene editing technology, we often talk about—but almost never deeply consider—the concept of designer babies. Consider...

Someone in a laboratory wears gloves on their hands, as they place a test tube filled with liquid into a centrifuge machine. Other laboratory equipment surrounds the room.

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Inside of a 23andMe packaging spit kit. On the right of the box, there is text that outlines instructions on how to submit a DNA sample. On the left, there are tools.

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A person in a lab coat and gloved hands uses tongs to life up a bottle that has been stored in cryopreservation

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