Op-Ed

At the front of the conference room, Robert Bradbury of the Aeivos Corporation is talking about immortality. He's showing us PowerPoint slides, with scientific graphs and charts. He's telling us about an artificial replacement for the human genome and about eliminating the need for a heart by replacing all the cells in the body with "vasaloid" systems. Immortality is probably not in the cards, Bradbury tells us, but once we eliminate all diseases it will be possible for us to live for 2,000 years. When we get rid of all the other hazards of living, we'll be looking at a life span of 7,000 years. Unless, of course, we happen to be over 40 years old already, in which case these technologies will come too late for us. Bradbury recommends that those of us past 40 look seriously into cryonics. If we have our heads frozen, we can be resurrected at some time in the future by our benevolent, superintelligent descendants. As Bradbury speaks, I remember the cemetery across from the Yale University campus that I passed on in way...