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About Disability & Human Biotechnology


Disability rights advocates have been among the earliest and most vocal critics of emerging genetic and reproductive technologies. Many people with disabilities are acutely aware that technologies enabling the selection of “good” genes and “normal” traits can devalue disabled people’s bodies and ultimately their lives.

This concern is informed by past and ongoing discrimination against people with disabilities that often includes brutal practices. For example, twentieth-century eugenicis­ts in the United States and some European countries sponsored programs that sterilized tens of thousands of disabled people. The Nazi genocide began with doctors and nurses exterminating over 100,000 disabled people in German medical facilities; tens of thousands more perished in concentration camps.

This historical context gives pause to disability rights advocates concerned about existing selection technologies that are increasingly being used to prevent the birth of children with particular traits, as well as future technologies that could be used to modify children’s genes.



"3-Parent Baby" Procedure Faces New Hurdleby Karen WeintraubScientific AmericanNovember 30th, 2016Mitochondrial disease can somehow creep back in, even if a mother’s mitochondria are virtually eliminated in an attempt to block inherited illnesses.
Human Gene Editing: A Timeline of CRISPR Cover StoriesWith recent gene editing tools, a number of high-profile media are featuring CRISPR on their covers and front pages. We gather highlights since early 2015, along with opinion polls, TV shows, and editorial board statements.
Review of Blame: A Novelby Abby Lippman, Biopolitical Times guest contributorNovember 28th, 2016Blame is especially important for those unfamiliar with the range of ethical, social, legal, and political issues raised by applications of what is learned in a lab. While a work of fiction, it is definitely not science-fiction
Obama’s Science Advisors Are Worried About Future CRISPR Terrorismby Daniel OberhausVICE MotherboardNovember 21st, 2016PCAST warn that under current legislation, there is no room for rapid response to threats and misuse, recommending improved biosurveillance as a solution.
Why the Deaf Community Fears President Trumpby Sara NovicVICENovember 18th, 2016According to his biographer, Trump subscribes to a racehorse theory of human development and the superiority of certain genes — an echo of eugenics.
Palo Alto committee debates whether Jordan school should keep its eugenicist namesakeby Jacqueline LeeSan Jose Mercury NewsNovember 17th, 2016David Starr Jordan, Stanford University’s first president, believed the human race could be improved through selective reproduction, including forced sterilization.
DNA-editing breakthrough could fix 'broken genes' in the brain, delay ageing and cure incurable diseasesby Ian JohnstonThe Independent [UK]November 16th, 2016The technique allows DNA changes that have not previously been possible, modifying the genes of non-dividing cells in a living animal.
Seeding Doubt: How Self-Appointed Guardians of “Sound Science” Tip the Scales Toward Industryby Liza GrossThe InterceptNovember 15th, 2016Sense About Science has downplayed concerns about industry-funded research and promoted science that favors private interests over public health.
Stem Cell Clinics Promise Miracle Cures, but at What Cost to Patients?by Philip PerryBig ThinkNovember 13th, 2016Taking advantage of a regulatory loophole, hundreds of clinics with virtually no oversight are offering stem cell therapies which are virtually untested, and make unsubstantiated claims about helping patients overcome disease.
Stem Cell Researchers Anxious About Trump Presidencyby Gillian MohneyABC NewsNovember 11th, 2016Mike Pence opposes federal funding for embryonic stem cell research. But reintroducing a funding ban "would be like putting a genie back in the bottle."
San Diego Scientists Help Develop New Twist On In Vitro Fertilizationby David WagnerKPBSNovember 10th, 2016The patent holder for a related "3-person IVF" technique reports new work with "polar body genome transfer." Some experts say none of these approaches have been proven safe.
I’m a disabled American. Trump’s policies will be a disaster for people like me.by Ari Ne'emanVoxNovember 9th, 2016The anticipated loss of support infrastructure that is essential to living with a disability may lead to greater solidarity from other progressive groups.
Genetics startup Genos wants to pay you for your DNA databy Sarah BuhrTech CrunchNovember 1st, 2016Company plans to pay participants for full genome sequencing, starting with exomes, to create a disease variant map.
The shifting landscape in biosocial scienceby Brett MilanoHarvard GazetteNovember 1st, 2016Dorothy Roberts' two-part Tanner Lectures examine how a profound shift in biosocial science is affecting race and social inequality.
Genetic testing fumbles, revealing 'dark side' of precision medicineby Sharon BegleySTATOctober 31st, 2016Inconsistency in DNA interpretation and in the algorithms used among databases, unregulated by the FDA, contributed to a fatal outcome for a 5-year-old boy.
H.I.V. Arrived in the U.S. Long Before 'Patient Zero'by Donald G. McNeil Jr.New York TimesOctober 26th, 2016Recently uncovered evidence clears the assumed "source" of AIDS epidemic, and provides a window into cultural disease myths.
There Is No Leadership Geneby Tracy StaedterSeekerOctober 25th, 2016As genetic testing becomes mainstream, some consider using it to screen job applicants. Besides being unlawful discrimination, the science is highly unreliable.
First Spindle Nuclear Transfer Baby Has Low Mutant DNA Loadby Kate JohnsonMedscapeOctober 20th, 2016At the ASRM Scientific Congress, fertility doctors said they would continue using the mitochondrial manipulation procedure.
Surprisingly few new parents enlist in study to have baby's genome sequencedby Jocelyn KaiserScience MagazineOctober 19th, 2016The NIH-funded project, BabySeq, seeks to analyze protein-coding DNA for mutations in 7000 genes associated with childhood diseases.
Crispr’s IPO doesn’t hit its targetby Robert WeismanThe Boston GlobeOctober 19th, 2016CRISPR Therapeutics' public offering raises half that of its rivals Editas & Intellia -- a sign that the market may be pulling back on genome editing stocks.
7 Highlights from Nuffield Council’s Review on the Ethics of Genome Editingby Jessica Cussins, Biopolitical Times guest contributorOctober 18th, 2016A recent UK report discusses social and political implications of genetically engineering human reproduction and other controversial CRISPR applications.
The Misleading Promise of I.V.F. for Women Over 40by Jane E. BrodyThe New York TimesOctober 17th, 2016The fertility industry focuses on the 20 percent of women who succeed, not the 80 percent failure rate.
DNA database could help predict your disease — then get you firedby David LazarusLos Angeles TimesOctober 14th, 2016Precision medicine raises the disturbing prospect of genetic haves and have-nots, and of discrimination based not on race, age or gender but on health.
Advocacy group anecdotes present one-sided picture of genetic testing for breast cancerby Mary Chris JaklevicHealth News ReviewOctober 13th, 2016The push to test for BRCA genes often glosses over the limited information it provides, advocates' corporate ties, and the lack of support for women who test positive.
Three-person baby 'race' dangerous[citing CGS' Marcy Darnovsky]by James GallagherBBCOctober 12th, 2016Scientists and ethicists warn of fertility doctors forum-shopping to perform dangerous mitochondrial manipulation experiments.
Some I.V.F. Experts Discourage Multiple Birthsby Jane E. BrodyThe New York TimesOctober 10th, 2016The first IVF baby resulted from a single transferred embryo. After years of encouraging multiple embryo transfers and multiple births, the rates are finally dropping.
President signs Senate bill that protects eugenics victimsby Richard CraverWinston-Salem JournalOctober 7th, 2016State restitution payments will not decrease or eliminate federal benefits for people who were forcibly sterilized.
Uterus Transplants Fail Again: Why Are They So Difficult?by Rachael RettnerLive ScienceOctober 5th, 2016Four uterus transplants using live donors took place in Dallas, a first in the U.S. But three of the uteruses had to be removed due to lack of proper blood flow.
What’s the Longest Humans Can Live? 115 Years, New Study Saysby Carl ZimmerThe New York TimesOctober 5th, 2016Despite improvements in modern life and medicine, researchers claim that humans have reached the upper limit of longevity.
Sally Phillips: Do We Really Want a World without Down’s Syndrome?by Viv GroskopThe Guardian October 1st, 2016The UK national health service will now cover new tests to screen fetuses for Down syndrome. A mother and actress notes the likely result: "It becomes ‘your fault’ if you choose to have the baby."
The VA Will Now Pay For Fertility Treatment For Wounded Vetsby Merrit KennedyNPRSeptember 30th, 2016Congress overturns a 1992 law in order to provide benefits to veterans with reproductive injuries looking to build families.
This May Be The Most Horrible Thing That Donald Trump Believesby Marina Fang & JM RiegerThe Huffington PostSeptember 28th, 2016A film pulls together clips of Trump expressing his eugenic views that intelligence and success are genetically inherited, making some groups destined to failure.
Find a Sperm Donor with This UK Appby Selena LarsonCNNMoneySeptember 28th, 2016The London Sperm Bank's new mobile app lets consumers choose sperm provider traits including eye color, hair color, and race.
Doctors Dig for More Data About Patientsby Melanie EvansWall Street JournalSeptember 25th, 2016In the name of improving treatment, some hospitals are buying their patients' consumer and financial data from third-party brokers.
Can CRISPR–Cas9 Boost Intelligence?by Jim KozubekScientific AmericanSeptember 23rd, 2016There are no superior genes, only genes that provide advantages with a tradeoff for other disadvantages. But some argue that there is a duty to manipulate the genetic code of future children.
The End of China’s One-Child Policy Has Put Huge Pressure on the Nation’s Sperm Banksby Hannah BeechTimeSeptember 21st, 2016Unlike in the US, selling sperm or eggs is illegal in China, but sperm banks get around that by offering men "subsidies." And illegal sperm banks have proliferated.
Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Announces $3 Billion Investment To Cure All Diseaseby Eyder PeraltaNPRSeptember 21st, 2016For some perspective, the fiscal 2016 budget for the National Institutes of Health is more than $31 billion.
Patients Turn To San Diego Stem Cell Companies For Costly, Unproven Treatmentsby David WagnerKPBSSeptember 20th, 2016One patient lost hundreds of thousands of dollars pursuing unapproved stem cell treatments, and was left with a painful tumor and significantly decreased mobility.
White House science advisers urge Justice Dept., judges to raise forensic standardsby Spencer S. HsuWashington PostSeptember 20th, 2016A new report cautions that widely used methods to trace complex DNA samples to criminal defendants fall short of scientific standards.
Why we need a law to prevent genetic discriminationby Yvonne Bombard, Ronald Cohn & Stephen SchererThe Globe and Mail [Canada]September 19th, 2016After unanimous passage through Canada's Senate, a bill on genetic discrimination is now before the House of Commons.
DNA Dragnet: In Some Cities, Police Go From Stop-and-Frisk to Stop-and-Spitby Lauren KirchnerProPublicaSeptember 12th, 2016Private police DNA databases are multiplying, and are subject to no state or federal regulation or oversight.
Passing My Disability On to My Childrenby Sheila BlackThe New York TimesSeptember 7th, 2016Drawing on hew own experience, the author challenges the logic of creating "designer babies" with screening or modifying technologies.
Sperm Donor at Heart of Canadian Lawsuits Admits He Lied to Company Xytex, Police Sayby Diana MehtaThe Canadian PressAugust 30th, 2016Amidst pending lawsuits, Sperm Donor 9623 has turned himself in to the police for "falsifying paperwork."
These New Stem Cell Treatments Are Expensive — and Unprovenby Michael HiltzikLos Angeles TimesAugust 19th, 2016"Stem cells have become a medical buzzword," Paul Knoepfler notes. "I see a lot of businesses using direct marketing to patients to take advantage of that."
ExAC Project Pins Down Rare Gene VariantsNature EditorialAugust 17th, 2016A new study found only 9 of 192 variants were actually linked to pathogenic disease despite ongoing use in diagnosis and treatment.
Scientists break 13-year silence to insist 'three-parent baby' technique is safeby Ian JohnstonThe IndependentAugust 11th, 2016The researchers conclude the technique "can produce a viable pregnancy." But the pregnancy they established resulted in miscarriage.
The Human Genome Is Having Its Facebook Momentby Whet MoserChicago MagazineAugust 9th, 2016In less than a decade, as many people could have their genomes sequenced as use the social networking site (~1.7 billion monthly users).
Why gene-therapy drugs are so expensiveby N.L.The EconomistAugust 3rd, 2016British pharmaceutical company GSK announced it will charge US$665,000 for a gene therapy for ADA-SCID (aka "bubble boy disease").
Cochlear implants boosted by gene therapy plus tiny LEDsby Clare WilsonNew ScientistJuly 7th, 2016Implants that use light instead of currents may facilitate hearing more easily than cochlear implants.
The "Outing" of Sperm Donor 9623by Hasmik DjoulakianBiopolitical TimesJuly 1st, 2016A lawsuit by families who used the sperm of a "schizophrenic felon" lands at the complicated intersection of fertility clinic negligence, genetic reductionism, disability, and eugenics.
What does Brexit mean for bioethics?by Xavier SymonsBioEdgeJune 25th, 2016The UK may not leave the Council of Europe, the umbrella organization for the Committee on Bioethics.
Testing, testing: Prenatal genetic screeningby Joe GibesTrinity International University June 10th, 2016Confusion and uncertainty surround both the accuracy of prenatal genetic screening and people's understanding of what PGS is.
Swiss back genetic testing of embryos (again)by Celia LuterbacherSwiss InfoJune 5th, 2016Testing embryos can prevent transmission of serious genetic diseases, but also threatens discrimination against people with disabilities and a "slippery slope toward eugenics."
Will Modern Genetics Turn Us Into Gene “Genies”?[Collection of brief essays]by Marcy Darnovsky, Dan Sarewitz, Samuel Weiss Evans, Arvis Sulovari, Eric A. WidraZócalo Public SquareMay 24th, 2016Contributors discuss their stances on the dangers and potential benefits of gene manipulation.
Should Women Be Able to Abort a Fetus Just Because It’s Female?by Emma GreenThe AtlanticMay 16th, 2016A new wave of state legislation that prohibits abortion based on sex, race, and genetic abnormality, is "meant to put women in this queasy position of having to justify two things that might not fit together in one political belief."
Huntington’s disease: the new gene therapy that sufferers cannot affordby Dara MohammadiThe Guardian [UK]May 15th, 2016Efforts to treat Huntington’s disease involve costly drugs way beyond the reach of the poor communities in South America who take part in research studies
Scientists are trying to use CRISPR to fix everything. What’s wrong with that?by Emily McManusTED IdeasMay 5th, 2016A historian of eugenics asks: "Will individuals start making decisions to use new biotech to improve themselves and their children?"
Let people most affected by gene editing write CRISPR rulesby Jessica HamzelouNew ScientistApril 29th, 2016The US National Academies' committee on human gene editing held a discussion in Paris at the French National Academy of Medicine.
Dwarfism, Chemical Limb Lengthening, and Informed Consentby Joseph StramondoInternational Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics BlogApril 25th, 2016A California biotech company is testing a drug designed to "normalize" annual growth but not address health complications of dwarfism.
Human Experimentation: Rethinking The 'Bad Old Days'by Barron LernerForbesApril 19th, 2016The horrors in our medical past require that we not brush them aside as just wrong but that we look hard at why they happened.
In IVF, Questions About ‘Mosaic’ Embryosby Kira PeikoffThe New York TimesApril 18th, 201620% of embryos have both "normal" and "abnormal" cells, generating false positive genetic test results, and questions among fertility clinics about whether to implant.
‘Buffer genes’ may protect these 13 people from rare genetic diseasesby Jocelyn KaiserScience/AAASApril 11th, 2016Researchers analyzed the DNA of 589,000 anonymous donors, but could not contact the 13 people to verify they were healthy.
Turning to technology when nature isn't enough for pregnancyby Marion CallahanBucks County Courier Times / The HeraldApril 9th, 2016“Gender is not a disease; it's a preference. Once you start doing it for preferences, not medical reasons, you are opening a door to a big slippery slope.”
Yeast Infection Led to Removal of Transplanted Uterusby Denise GradyThe New York TimesApril 8th, 2016Just two weeks after the first US uterus transplant, the organ had to be removed because a common yeast infection posed life-threatening risks.
MIT research suggests possibility of gene therapy to treat ADHDby Lindsay KalterBoston HeraldMarch 23rd, 2016Controversial research in mice, seeking a genetic link to ADHD, may eventually lead to clinical attempts to "introduce genetic material that might be missing from the human."
CRISPR Pioneer Feng Zhang Talks About What's Next for Gene Editingby Kate LunauVICE MotherboardMarch 23rd, 2016“The field is still very young,” but Zhang hopes CRISPR is a way to address conditions that he characterizes as psychiatric, including depression, schizophrenia, autism and Alzheimer’s.
Dinosaurs are Extinct, but Normalization is Alive and Wellby Emily Beitiks, Biopolitical Times guest contributorMarch 22nd, 2016While the disability movement is pushing us away from the reductive concept of "normal", dinosaur education for our kids lags behind.
Placenta test for autism risk sparks serious concernby Ann GriswoldSpectrum NewsMarch 21st, 2016“There are no published data to support the new test as a screening tool."
Texas Woman Is the First Person to Undergo Optogenetic Therapyby Katherine BourzacMIT Technology ReviewMarch 18th, 2016Beyond the implications for treating blind people, this gene therapy trial is also being watched by the neuroscience community.
Why Surrogacy Laws Must Be Established — the Story of the Ott-Dahlsby Keston Ott-DahlHuffPostMarch 18th, 2016When my partner Andrea became a surrogate for another lesbian couple we had no idea we would end up starting over as new parents.
Uterus Transplants: Identifying Stakeholders & Objectionsby Elliot HosmanMarch 10th, 2016Clinical trials have migrated from Sweden to the US, and questions regarding safety, ethics, and social justice are mounting.
When baby is due, genetic counselors seen downplaying false alarmsby Beth DaleyNew England Center for Investigative ReportingMarch 6th, 2016Even after the birth, when their baby looked fine, their genetic counselor insisted that the result of the test was not a mistake.
'Imbeciles' Explores Legacy Of Eugenics In AmericaAll Things Considered, NPRFebruary 26th, 2016Adam Cohen's new book tells the story of the 1927 Supreme Court case Buck v. Bell. The ruling permitted the state of Virginia to sterilize an "imbecile" — a scientific term of the day.
The Possibility Of A Three-Parent Baby[cites CGS' Marcy Darnovsky]by Indira LakshamananThe Diane Rehm ShowFebruary 25th, 2016A discussion about the science, ethics, and politics of a controversial technique that is a form of inheritable genetic modification.
Genetic information as “perceived disability”: Chadam v. PAUSD by Jennifer K. WagnerGenomics Law ReportFebruary 23rd, 2016Parents are alleging that a school district violated their son's rights when it transferred the boy to another school due to a genetic marker he carries.
Should you edit your children’s genes?by Erika Check HaydenNature NewsFebruary 23rd, 2016In the fierce debate about CRISPR gene editing, it’s time to give patients a voice.
What’s the difference between genetic engineering and eugenics?by Robert GebelhoffThe Washington PostFebruary 22nd, 2016Where we draw the line between "negative eugenics" and "positive genetic intervention" is a political question.
We Are This Close to "Designer Babies"[cites CGS' Marcy Darnovsky]by Nina Liss-SchultzMother JonesFebruary 8th, 2016Issues to consider in light of the UK's approval of using CRISPR gene editing on human embryos for research.
Zika Virus Threat Puts Abortion Rights And Disability Rights On Collision Courseby Chloe AngyalHuffPost PoliticsFebruary 4th, 2016As the epidemic spreads, women's rights to abortion are a hot topic -- but what about the rights of the disabled?
We Are Not Ready to Edit Human Embryos Yetby J. Craig VenterTimeFebruary 2nd, 2016Due to our insufficient knowledge, the slippery slope to human enhancement, and the global ban on human experimentation, we need to better understand the software of life before we begin re-writing this code.
We Need More Proof That Prenatal Gene Screens Are Beneficialby The EditorsScientific AmericanFebruary 1st, 2016Results from screening tests can be misleading. Industry and federal regulators are not doing enough to ensure that people get all the information they need.
A Monkey Circles in a Cageby Elliot Hosman, Biopolitical TimesJanuary 29th, 2016Researchers created transgenic monkeys with a gene duplication associated with Rett Syndrome autism in humans, raising concerns of the limits and ethics of using animal models in biomedical research.
The United States Once Sterilized Tens of Thousands — Here’s How the Supreme Court Allowed Itby Trevor BurrusMediumJanuary 27th, 2016A lucid and accurate discussion of Buck v. Bell, what led up to it, and its consequences both personal and political.
Will creating monkeys with autism-like symptoms be any use?by Sam WongNew ScientistJanuary 25th, 2016Researchers are divided on whether a condition like autism can be meaningfully reproduced in monkeys.
The Battle Over CRISPR Could Make Or Break Some Biotech Companies[cites CGS' Marcy Darnovsky]by Farai ChideyaFiveThirtyEightJanuary 25th, 2016CRISPR is caught up in public offerings and a patent dispute. If used to "edit" heritable traits, it could lead us into a world of genetic haves and have-nots.
Down's Syndrome people risk 'extinction' at the hands of science, fear and ignoranceby Tim StanleyThe TelegraphJanuary 18th, 2016The true moral test of a society is not how pretty, sober or well organised it is – but how it treats its most vulnerable, even its most difficult, citizens.
Jordan Middle School, other schools now up for renamingby Elena KadvanyPalo Alto WeeklyJanuary 13th, 2016Middle school students and their parents are objecting to their school being named for Stanford University founding president David Starr Jordan, because of his involvement in the eugenics movement.
Women can ‘grow’ their own IVF embryos with in-body incubatorby Andy CoghlanNew ScientistJanuary 6th, 2016In a US clinical trial, embryos in an incubation device were placed into women's bodies for five days before removal to select the "fittest" embryo to implant for pregnancy.
When California Sterilized 20,000 of Its Citizensby Alexandra Minna SternZocalo Public SquareJanuary 6th, 2016The Golden State was the most aggressive in the country in deeming the "feebleminded" and "deviant" unfit to reproduce.
A startup that wants to start using a controversial gene-editing tool in people by 2017 just filed to go publicby Lydia RamseyBusiness InsiderJanuary 4th, 2016Editas Medicine, co-founded by Feng Zhang, is developing a CRISPR gene therapy for rare blindness with human trials planned for 2017.
Whatever Happened to Human Experimentation?by Carl ElliottHastings Center ReportJanuary 1st, 2016The choice to abandon the word “experiment” is emblematic of a larger movement beginning in the 1990s, in which many bioethics scholars moved from being critics of the research enterprise to being its champions.
CRISPR helps heal mice with muscular dystrophyby Jocelyn KaiserScience/AAASDecember 31st, 2015Three research groups report using CRISPR in mice to modify a gene associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the first time CRISPR has been delivered throughout the body to treat grown animals with a genetic disease.
Screening sperm donors for autism? As an autistic person, I know that’s the road to eugenics[cites CGS]by Ari Ne'emanThe GuardianDecember 30th, 2015The London Sperm Bank and other clinics are using technology and making decisions to remove certain people from future generations.
Poverty's Role in Intellectual Developmentby Eric JaffeCity LabDecember 18th, 2015New research finds that a disadvantaged environment can prevent genetics from doing its job.
Clinical Genetics Has a Big Problem That's Affecting People's Livesby Ed YongThe AtlanticDecember 17th, 2015Many geneticists have tales where mistakes in the scientific literature have led to wrong — and sometimes harmful — diagnoses.
Livetweeting #GeneEditSummit: Democratized Debate or Segregated Conversations?by Elliot Hosman, Biopolitical TimesDecember 10th, 2015Though #GeneEditSummit was trending on Twitter, inclusive public debate must be more robust than the livetweeting of insular stakeholder meetings.
About Us, Without Us: Inclusion in the Threat of Eradicationby Teresa Blankmeyer BurkeImpact EthicsDecember 8th, 2015Disability rights advocates are still excluded from conversations (such as the International Summit on Human Gene Editing) that involve the survival of our communities.
CRISPR Gene Editing: Proofreaders and Undo Buttons, but Ever "Safe" Enough?by Elliot Hosman, Biopolitical TimesNovember 19th, 2015Recent trends include research reports of "spellcheck" and "undo" functions associated with CRISPR gene editing, and a shift toward greater caution about germline applications.
Gene Therapy: Comeback? Cost-Prohibitive?by Elliot Hosman, Biopolitical TimesNovember 19th, 2015Recent CRISPR news sometimes confuses germline modification - which should be put off limits - and gene therapy, which presents its own set of social and ethical risks to resolve before rushing to market.
Gene Manipulation In Human Embryos Provokes Ethical Questions: This controversial new research could have some serious, long-term societal implications. [Video][With CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]
Gene Manipulation In Human Embryos Provokes Ethical Questions[cites CGS' Marcy Darnovsky]by Rahel GebreyesHuffPost LiveNovember 17th, 2015CGS's Marcy Darnovsky discusses the social implications of leveraging CRISPR gene editing tools to pursue enhanced children.
Better Babiesby Nathaniel ComfortAeonNovember 17th, 2015The long and peculiar history of the designer human, from Plato’s citizen breeders to Nobel sperm banks, and the latest iteration of human genetic perfectability: CRISPR gene editing.
Gene therapies offer dramatic promise but shocking costsby Carolyn Y. Johnson & Brady DennisThe Washington PostNovember 11th, 2015Researchers have partially restored a patient's vision by targeting a gene associated with Leber's congenital amaurosis, but the treatment could cost $500,000 per eye.
CRISPR Gene Editing to Be Tested on People by 2017, Says Editasby Antonio RegaladoMIT Technology ReviewNovember 5th, 2015The test, to treat a rare form of blindness, would likely be the first to use CRISPR to directly edit the DNA of a person.
Everything you need to know about why CRISPR is such a hot technology[cites CGS]by Dominic BasultoThe Washington PostNovember 4th, 2015Venture capital is responding to the hype surrounding new genetic engineering tools, but many are concerned by the controversial proposition of genetically modifying new humans.
Would you edit your unborn child’s genes so they were successful?by Mairi LevittThe GuardianNovember 3rd, 2015A parent’s desire to do the best for their child could create problems.
Forgotten Stories of the Eugenic Age #4, Part 3: The Blurry Boundaries of Eugenic Infanticideby Natalie OveyssiBiopolitical TimesOctober 29th, 2015The final entry of the three-part examination of Dr. Harry Haiselden, Baby John Bollinger, and the practice of eugenic infanticide explores the legacy of Haiselden’s career and its meaning for the rights of individuals with disabilities.
Expanding Notions of Discrimination: Genetic Information & Competitive Sportsby Craig KlugmanBioethics.netOctober 16th, 2015The International Olympic Committee has new hormonal guidelines to segregate athletes into two competitive sex categories.
Forgotten Stories of the Eugenic Age #4, Part 2: The Black Stork Rises: Dr. Haiselden’s Celebrity and Public Controversyby Natalie OveyssiBiopolitical TimesOctober 14th, 2015After Baby Bollinger’s death under Dr. Haiselden’s care, letter-writers flooded newspapers with both praise and criticism. Haiselden went on to co-write and star in The Black Stork, a film celebrating eugenic medicine.
First 'in womb' stem cell trial to beginby James GallagherBBCOctober 12th, 2015A UK clinical trial injecting fetal stem cells into babies still in the womb will attempt to lessen symptoms of an incurable brittle bone diseases.
Next-Generation Prenatal Genetic Tests Are Turning Fate Into Choiceby Michael WhitePacific StandardOctober 9th, 2015The new tests mean that many more women are grappling with the decision of whether to continue or end a pregnancy based on genetic information.
UK Womb Transplants: 5 Ethical Issuesby Rachael RettnerLive ScienceOctober 5th, 2015The procedure would expose both patient and developing fetus to autoimmune suppressants, use uteruses from deceased donors, and require that clinical patients have a "long-term partner."
Womb transplants given UK go-aheadBBCSeptember 30th, 2015Ten women will be chosen for a clinical trial that will transplant a donated uterus, monitor organ acceptance for a year, and initiate up to two IVF pregnancies before removing the transplant.
Why Some Parents Choose to Have a Deaf Babyby Rich WordsworthMotherboardSeptember 29th, 2015Some deaf parents ask, "What’s wrong with being deaf, anyway? I’m happy to be who I am."
Can 23andMe have it all?by Kelly ServickScienceSeptember 25th, 2015The company has made about 30 deals with biotech and pharma companies, and plans to hire 25 scientists in the next year to begin drug discovery efforts of its own.
What If Tinder Showed Your IQ?by Dalton ConleyNautilusSeptember 24th, 2015Hypothetical scenarios from a future in which human genetic engineering is pervasive.
Ohio Abortion Bill Stokes Old Tensions between Disability and Abortion Rights Advocatesby Emma ManiereBiopolitical TimesSeptember 24th, 2015A round-up of recent articles and commentaries about Ohio’s HB 135, which would ban abortions sought due to fetal diagnoses of Down syndrome.
Forgotten Stories of the Eugenic Age #4, Part 1: The Short Life and Eugenic Death of Baby John Bollingerby Natalie OveyssiBiopolitical TimesSeptember 24th, 2015In 1915, Dr. Harry Haiselden refused to operate to save the life of John Bollinger, a baby with disabilities, whom he believed would be a burden on society.
The hidden risks for 'three-person' babiesby Garry HamiltonNature NewsSeptember 23rd, 2015"There's a definite possibility you'd see things like disrupted fertility function, various forms of metabolic syndromes and changes in things that relate to metabolism in general."
Is It Time To Re-Think Autism?by Joe ShuteThe Telegraph September 23rd, 2015The author of a new book argues for the need to recognise the vital role that autism has played in shaping human history.
Down Syndrome Blood Test Sparks Abortion Debateby Amy Dockser MarcusWall Street JournalSeptember 21st, 2015Advocates worry that more accurate prenatal tests will lead more people to end pregnancies without understanding how life with Down syndrome has dramatically changed.
Disability and the Politics of Abortion by Judith LevineSeven Days [Vermont]September 9th, 2015We must not use technology to cull fetuses that might have differently abled bodies. We cannot allow abortion law to rescue them at the cost of their mothers' freedom.
Does Down Syndrome Justify Abortion?by Mark Lawrence SchradNew York TimesSeptember 4th, 2015In a typical pregnancy, women who choose to have an abortion are often saddled with shame and social stigma. Meanwhile, there remains significant stigma associated with being the parent of a child with special needs.
Calls for IVF laws to be changed to take advantage of gene editing technique by Steve ConnorThe IndependentSeptember 2nd, 2015A statement by medical research funders in the UK suggests that benefits of modifying the human germ-line could outweigh the ethical objections.
Debate Ensues as Prenatal Tests Reach Beyond Down Syndromeby Antonio RegaladoMIT Technology ReviewAugust 31st, 2015Doctors and genetic counselors question the expanding scope of blood tests during pregnancy.
Banning Abortion for Down Syndrome: Legal or Ethical Justification? by Bonnie SteinbockHastings Center Bioethics ForumAugust 26th, 2015Instead of passing an unenforceable and unconstitutional law, Ohio should devote its time to ensuring that all people with disabilities, Down syndrome or otherwise, get the resources and services they need.
Court: $50M verdict in Seattle-area ‘wrongful birth’ doesn't shock the conscienceby Levi PulkkinenSeattlePIAugust 26th, 2015A Washington appeals court upheld a $50 million verdict in favor of a couple whose son was born with severe birth defects that should have been spotted by genetic testing.
Ohio Bill Would Ban Abortion if Down Syndrome Is Reasonby Tamar LewinThe New York TimesAugust 22nd, 2015The legislature is expected to approve the measure. Gov. John Kasich, a Republican who is running for president, opposes abortion but has not yet taken a position on this bill.
Conversation with Kelly Hills: Human Genetic Modification & Bioethicsby Paul KnoepflerKnoepfler Lab Stem Cell BlogAugust 20th, 2015“It can be very tempting, when `doing science,’ to merely think about the pieces in front of you: I’m swapping out broken DNA for something better! But…how do we define broken? How do we define better?”
Právo: No One Wants Czech Child Born to Surrogate Mother by CTKPrague Daily MonitorAugust 13th, 2015The Czech infant, now a year old, was diagnosed with congenital epilepsy and paralysis. Both the intended parents and surrogate mother renounced parental rights, leaving him in institutional care.
Putting Ourselves in Harm's Way: Thoughts on Pinker and the Role of Bioethicsby Nathaniel Comfort, Biopolitical Times guest contributorAugust 12th, 2015Nathaniel Comfort confronts Steven Pinker and the legacy of biomedicine, arguing ethicists and historians need to "get in harm's way to spare harm to others."
Can We Cure Genetic Diseases Without Slipping Into Eugenics?by Nathaniel ComfortThe NationJuly 16th, 2015Gene editing could correct genetic mutations for serious illnesses. Will it also create a new eugenics of personal choice?
Eliminating Intersex Babies Is not a Legitimate Use of Genetic Embryo Testingby Celeste OrrThe GuardianJuly 11th, 2015Using preimplantation genetic diagnosis to select against embryos with culturally devalued bodies, like intersex people and people with disabilities, is simply a contemporary example of eugenics.
Misunderstanding the Genome: A (Polite) Rantby Jonathan GitlinArsTechnicaJuly 8th, 2015One misconception: Genetic tests don't always tell you if someone has a disease. They're typically probabilistic — they tell you if you've got a greater chance of a problem than the average person.
First Federal Bill to Acknowledge US Eugenics Would Help Victims of State Sterilization Programsby Jonathan ChernoguzBiopolitical TimesJuly 8th, 2015If passed, it would be the first federal legislation to recognize the history of sterilization abuse that took place during the twentieth century in the name of eugenics.
Forgotten Stories of the Eugenic Age #1: How “Better Babies” Became “Fitter Families”by Natalie OveyssiBiopolitical TimesJuly 7th, 2015The first post in a new series on lesser-known stories of the American eugenics movement examines how baby health contests shifted focus to the family with the help of one key, familiar individual.
Down Syndrome Screening isn’t About Public Health. It’s About Eliminating a Group of People.by Renate LindemanWashington PostJune 16th, 2015Testing should be used to enhance health and human well-being instead of discriminating against people based on their genetic predisposition.
The Bioethics of Genetic Diversityby Xavier SymonsBioEdgeJune 6th, 2015The ethical issues surrounding the protection of genetic variation in a population are examined.
Let’s Talk About the Ethics of Germline Modificationby Gregor WolbringImpact EthicsMay 27th, 2015We need clarity about where the public discussion should take place, what exactly it should focus on, and who should participate.
The Scope of Eugenics: A Workshopby Jonathan ChernoguzBiopolitical TimesMay 27th, 2015The four-day workshop, organized by the Edmonton-based Living Archives Project on Eugenics in Western Canada, brought together early-career scholars interested in eugenics to discuss historical models and forms of "Newgenics."
Do We Really Need an Even Better Prenatal Test for Down Syndrome?by Chris KaposyImpact EthicsMay 19th, 2015Because of their ease of use and their non-invasiveness, the new non-invasive prenatal tests for Down syndrome could contribute to increased numbers of selective terminations of pregnancy.
Innovation and Equity in an Age of Gene Editingby Charis Thompson, Ruha Benjamin, Jessica Cussins and Marcy DarnovskyThe GuardianMay 19th, 2015As experts gather in Atlanta to discuss the rights and wrongs of editing human genomes, four of the attendees explain why it is vital to put social justice at the heart of the debate.
Public interest group calls for strengthening global policies against human germline modification[Press statement]April 22nd, 2015“No researcher has the moral warrant to flout the globally widespread policy agreement against altering the human germline.”
Markingson case: University of Minnesota can't regain trust under current leadershipby Arne H. CarlsonStar TribuneApril 13th, 2015We will not see meaningful reform of research on human subjects so long as leaders responsible for years of denials and stonewalling remain in charge.
Calling for “More than a Moratorium” on Human Germline Modificationby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesApril 9th, 2015A broader array of critical responses and policy suggestions follows recent reports that the gene-editing technique CRISPR has been used to genetically modify human sperm, eggs or embryos.
Fetal DNA Tests Prove Highly Accurate but Experts Warn of Exceptionsby Julie SteenhuysenReutersApril 1st, 2015The newer tests are not regulated by the FDA, and companies are heavily promoting their performance in ways that may mislead patients, critics say.
Kaiser to Look for Autism’s Causes in Large-Scale Studyby  Victoria ColliverSan Francisco ChronicleMarch 31st, 2015Scientists have long suspected that autism results from a combination of genetics and environmental factors, but no one knows for sure.
Attorneys: Sterilizations were Part of Plea Deal Talksby  Sheila BurkeAssociated PressMarch 28th, 2015Nashville prosecutors have made sterilization of women part of plea negotiations at least four times in the past five years.
165,000 Engagements End Due to ‘Genetic Incompatibilities’by Hussain Hazzazi and Ayman Al-SaidalaniSaudi GazetteMarch 24th, 2015In Saudi Arabia, health checkups are mandatory for engaged couples before they get married. The program aims to reduce the risk of having children with any blood or gastronomical diseases.
Lisa Ikemoto Guest Piece on Human Germline Genetic Modificationby Lisa C. IkemotoKnoepfler Lab Stem Cell BlogMarch 23rd, 2015The call for a moratorium is as much a game changer as the technology itself. It creates an opportunity for research transparency and open exchange between the scientific community and the lay public.
Could 'Superdonors' Make Replacement Organs That Work In Anyone?by Luke TimmermanForbesFebruary 9th, 2015Scientists have known for years there are people in the world with a rare gift—their cells look innocuous to the immune systems of many other people. What if they became “superdonors?”
FDA Regulation and Early Prenatal Testingby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorFebruary 5th, 2015The information that accompanies prenatal testing should be accurate, complete, useful, and most of all nondirective. The ads for early prenatal tests do not meet these criteria.
Prenatal Tests: Oversold and Misunderstoodby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorDecember 16th, 2014A scathing investigative report on the accuracy of noninvasive prenatal testing is likely to shift the terms of this important conversation.
The ‘Science’ of Eugenics: America’s Moral Detourby Marilyn M. SingletonJournal of American Physicians and SurgeonsDecember 15th, 2014Within 100 years, our deep thinkers went from declaring that in our new country “all men are created equal” to espousing the idea that “some men are more equal than others.”
Have New Prenatal Tests Been Dangerously Oversold?by Beth DaleyNew England Center for Investigative ReportingDecember 12th, 2014Many prenatal testing companies promise more than they can deliver. Two studies show that results can be a false alarm half of the time.
Commercialisation and the Moral Obligation to Create 'Designer' Babiesby John GallowayBioNewsDecember 8th, 2014Julian Savulescu made the case for a new 'eugenics', without ever using the word, at Progress Educational Trust's 2014 annual conference.
Thailand’s Parliament Approves Bill Banning Commercial surrogacyAssociated Press in BangkokNovember 28th, 2014The decision follows several surrogacy scandals this year, including one in which an Australian couple left behind a baby with Down syndrome.
UCLA Researchers Announce Gene Therapy Cure for 18 ‘Bubble Baby’ Patientsby Cath Becker and Suzan ClarkeGood Morning AmericaNovember 18th, 2014Researchers announced they have cured 18 children who were born with a genetic disorder that leaves them without a working immune system.
FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancementby Jonathan ChernoguzBiopolitical TimesNovember 12th, 2014The documentary produced and directed by Regan Brashear is receiving a new round of well-deserved positive attention around the world.
How the Pro-Choice Movement Excludes People With Disabilitiesby Lenzi SheibleRH Reality CheckOctober 17th, 2014If we in the pro-choice movement don’t start paying serious attention to the ways in which our own practices contribute to the dehumanization of people with disabilities, we can’t keep claiming to operate under a reproductive justice framework at all.
Three Years On, What Have We Learned About Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening?by Mark LeachDown Syndrome Prenatal TestingOctober 17th, 2014Three years ago, a new prenatal test for Down syndrome entered the market offering earlier, safer, and more accurate results. What have we learned about this new technology since then?
State to Send Out About 200 Eugenics Paymentsby Meghann EvansWinston-Salem JournalOctober 1st, 2014The first eugenics compensation payments are to be sent out by Oct. 31, and a second payment will be sent to victims next year.
The Troubling Persistence of Eugenicist Thought in Modern America by Michael Brendan DoughertyThe WeekSeptember 30th, 2014We no longer talk of "unfit" children, but we'll still destroy them in the name of quality of life.
An End to Sterilization Abuses in California Prisonsby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesSeptember 26th, 2014The signing of SB 1135 into California law by Gov. Jerry Brown is an important victory in the fight for the remembrance of our state's eugenic history and its ongoing implications.
Richard Dawkins Gets it all Wrong, Yet Again by George EstreichSalonSeptember 25th, 2014As a social media event, the Dawkins kerfuffle was fleeting, but as a conversation, it offers a glimpse of a larger question: How do “we” — that is, the non-disabled — think about people with intellectual disabilities?
A Manifesto for Playing God with Human Evolutionby Carl ElliottNew ScientistSeptember 8th, 2014Fancy living forever, or uploading your mind to the net? The Proactionary Imperative embraces transhumanist dreams, but reminds why we need medical ethics.
Body Upgrades may be Nearing Reality, but Only for the Richby Ian SampleThe GuardianSeptember 5th, 2014Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari says expensive human enhancements will lead to a society more unequal than ever.
Monument Seeks to End Silence on Killings of the Disabled by the Nazisby Melissa EddyThe New York TimesSeptember 2nd, 2014Among the last to have their suffering publicly acknowledged, the mentally ill and intellectually disabled victims of direct medical killings by the Nazis now have their own memorial in the heart of Berlin.
Disability Will Never Be Immoral by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesAugust 29th, 2014Prenatal genetic testing can be a valuable tool, but it provides strikingly limited data. Events of this summer, including the abandonment of Baby Gammy and shockingly intolerant comments from Richard Dawkins, speak to the risk of conflating one type of information with a broader reality.
Using Light Technique, Scientists Find Dimmer Switch for Memories in Miceby Pam BelluckThe New York TimesAugust 27th, 2014Using a technique in which light is used to switch neurons on and off, neuroscientists appear to have unlocked some secrets about how the brain attaches emotions to memories and how those emotions can be adjusted.
California Couple Shares Surrogate Story in Wake of Thailand Controversy by Beth GreenfieldYahoo! HealthAugust 19th, 2014When news broke earlier this month about baby Gammy, many were shocked. But not Keston and Andrea Ott-Dahl, a San Francisco couple who had a similar experience right here in America.
Dreams of Children Shattered as Thailand Closes All IVF Center by Lindsay MurdochThe Sydney Morning HeraldAugust 9th, 2014Thai authorities linked the Bangkok clinic with a suspected international “baby factory” trafficking syndicate said to be behind at least 14 babies destined for overseas.
Will my Disabled Daughter have a Place in this Genetic Wonderland?by Ian BirrellThe GuardianAugust 7th, 2014Until society gets to grips with prejudice we cannot start to grapple with the profound questions that medical advances raise.
Thai Case Casts Spotlight on Business of Surrogacyby Grant Peck and Kriten GelineauAP August 7th, 2014Contributing to Thailand's popularity as a surrogacy destination is the large number of impoverished women who will carry babies for a price, and the availability of doctors with good reproductive medical skills.
More Heart-Wrenching Chapters in the Baby Gammy Storyby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesAugust 7th, 2014Inadequate regulation of cross-border surrogacy has led to some truly awful stories, from coercion and exploitation of impoverished women, to children left stateless, to couples whose life savings have been embezzled by unscrupulous agencies. The unfolding story of Baby Gammy adds new dimensions to the complexities of contract pregnancies.
Surrogate Mother Cares for Baby Abandoned Because of Down Syndromeby Sonia Allan, Biopolitical Times guest contributorAugust 4th, 2014Many see Baby Gammy’s plight as highlighting the extent to which commercial surrogacy arrangements can exploit and commodify women and children.
Australian Couple Leaves Down Syndrome Baby with Thai Surrogate by Lindsay MurdochThe Sydney Morning HeraldJuly 31st, 2014Gammy, a six-month-old baby abandoned by his Australian parents, could die because his Thai surrogate mother cannot pay for medical treatment for his congenital heart condition.
The Perfect 46: A “Science Factual” Film about our Near Futureby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJuly 10th, 2014A new science fiction film called “a sort of prequel to Gattaca” highlights the rise and fall of a genetic startup that analyzes people’s genomes to assess their ability to produce disease-free children.
Should We Design Our Babies? [VIDEO] [With CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]The Aspen InstituteJuly 2nd, 2014At the Aspen Ideas Festival, Marcy Darnovsky and Nita A. Farahany discuss the possibility and implications of "designer babies."
Advancing the Disability Rights Perspective on Bioethics Issuesby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesJune 26th, 2014Reproductive technologies were on the agenda of the first-ever Disability Rights Leadership Institute on Bioethics.
Community Concerns Regarding the Google-Autism Speaks Ten Thousand Genomes Program (AUT10K)ASANJune 12th, 2014In response to the recent announcement of the new Google-Autism Speaks collaboration to produce, expand and analyze the world’s largest private collection of DNA samples of autistic children and adults.
A Medical Student’s Call for Action Against Research Misconductby Eden AlmasudeThe Hastings CenterJune 3rd, 2014Is research misconduct and abuse the norm in the University of Minnesota’s Department of Psychiatry? A recent investigative report suggests that the answer may well be yes.
Loophole in Genetic Testing Lawby Rachel GlaserWHAM TVMay 23rd, 2014People who undergo increasingly popular genetic testing could be penalized, forced to pay higher premiums or denied coverage for certain policies.
On Dialogue: Disability Studies and Science & Technology Studiesby Laura MauldinSomatosphereMay 19th, 2014The intersection of disability studies with science and technology studies can illuminate how we understand, act upon, cope with, and expect others to cope with human bodies.
Advancing the Disability Rights Perspective on Bioethics Issuesby Diane ColemanNot Dead YetMay 2nd, 2014The first ever Disability Rights Leadership Institute on Bioethics drew more than 60 participants.
NIPS SPINby Robert RestaThe DNA ExchangeApril 21st, 2014Every few years a new screening technology comes zooming down the prenatal pike, sometimes arriving more quickly than we might like. The latest iteration – Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening – stands head and shoulders above the rest.
Genetic Inheritance: How Much do you Want to Know?by Stuart JeffriesThe GuardianApril 4th, 2014Scientist Sharon Moalem says we will soon be able to alter our children's lives with genetic manipulation – would you do it if you could?
A Disturbing Trend: Conscience Clauses Threaten Genetic Counselingby Alex SternHuffington PostApril 2nd, 2014Conscience clauses place genetic counselors in an untenable predicament: State laws and hospital directives are in conflict with professional ethics and best practices.
Adrienne Asch: A Career at the Intersection of Bioethics and Disability Studiesby Sara BergstresserVoices in BioethicsMarch 12th, 2014Recognizing Adrienne Asch's pioneering work: Remembrances by three people who knew her both professionally and personally.
When Science Doesn't Have all the Answersby Louise KinrossBloomMarch 6th, 2014My son’s rare genetic deletion is on the list of disorders identified by microarray analysis of a fetus’s DNA. It makes me sad to think that the lives of children like my son are being targeted for termination. Is this a step forward?
The Market For DNA Sequencing-Based Down Syndrome Tests Could Exceed $6 Billionby Matthew HerperForbesFebruary 28th, 2014A study shows that a new DNA-sequencing based blood test provides a dramatic improvement in accuracy at screening for Down syndrome and a second, deadly disorder.
Is Genetic Testing Humans Playing God?by Robert KlitzmanCNNFebruary 22nd, 2014Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis allows doctors to test embryos before they are implanted into a woman's womb, to help ensure that certain gene mutations are not passed on. But this procedure is raising myriad complex ethical and social issues.
Old Songs, New Tests, and Expensive Childrenby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorFebruary 20th, 2014The CEO of AOL justified a restructuring of the company’s 401(K) plan by citing two "distressed babies." This tone-deaf insensitivity was answered by a disapproving choir, but it sadly resembles too many descriptions of the "cost" of people with disabilities.
To Catch a Killer Gene: Sisters Race to Stop Mystery Disease[Quotes CGS's Osagie K. Obasogie]by Tony DokoupilNBC NewsFebruary 6th, 2014This story of a family banding together to stop a disease before it cuts a path through society illustrates the promise of genomic medicine, but also the soul-troubling questions that arise when people have a hand in their own evolution.
Ethics Questions Arise as Genetic Testing of Embryos Increasesby Gina KolataThe New York TimesFebruary 3rd, 2014The procedure raises unsettling ethical questions that trouble advocates for the disabled and have left some doctors struggling with what they should tell their patients.
Can a Blind Person Be a Racist? [Excerpt]by Osagie ObasogieScientific AmericanJanuary 10th, 2014Racist attitudes are not rooted in the ability to actually "see" the color of someone’s skin.
Should Persons Affected by Mitochondrial Disorders Not be Brought Into Existence?by Professor Calum MacKellarBioNewsJanuary 6th, 2014What is being proposed is not a form of therapy in which a person is being treated or cured for a disorder. Instead, it is making sure that certain persons are not brought into existence.
An Ethics for the Future of Genetic Testingby Sara HendrenThe AtlanticDecember 30th, 2013As testing becomes more advanced, how should expecting parents weigh the information they have about a fetus with the information they don't?
Selling Tests, Selling Treatments: A Few Reflections on Medical Advertisingby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorDecember 18th, 2013The questions raised by the recent New York Times article about aggressive selling of ADD drugs should also be posed to those marketing non-invasive prenatal gene tests.
Too Much Informationby Amanda SchafferMIT Technology ReviewDecember 17th, 2013Advances in non-invasive prenatal screening could collide with the politics of abortion and raise the ugly specter of eugenics. Are there limits to how much data parents should have—or want to have—about their children before birth?
Building Better Humansby Zaineb MohammedEast Bay ExpressDecember 4th, 2013A new documentary looks at the impacts of human enhancement technologies. "I totally get the temptation," says the filmmaker. "But what are we fixing? Who is the problem?"
Adrienne Asch, Bioethicist and Pioneer in Disability Studies, Dies at 67by Margalit FoxThe New York TimesNovember 23rd, 2013Adrienne Asch, an internationally known bioethicist who opposed the use of prenatal testing and abortion to select children free of disabilities, died on Nov. 19 at her home in Manhattan.
Remembering Adrienne Aschby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesNovember 21st, 2013We mourn the death and deeply appreciate the life of Adrienne Asch, bioethicist, scholar, and disability rights activist.
Future Past: Disability, Eugenics, & Brave New Worldsby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesNovember 7th, 2013A public symposium held on November 1 at San Francisco State University provided a rare and important opportunity to engage with the historical and ongoing implications of eugenic ideologies and practices for people with disabilities.
Future Past: Disability, Eugenics, & Brave New Worldsby Jessica CussinsNovember 7th, 2013The public symposium Future Past: Disability, Eugenics, & Brave New Worlds, held on November 1 at San Francisco State University, provided a rare and important opportunity to engage with the history and ongoing implications of eugenic ideologies and practices for people with disabilities.
Disability Studies: A New Normalby Cecilia Capuzzi SimonThe New York TimesNovember 1st, 2013Like black studies, women’s studies and other liberation-movement disciplines, disability studies teaches that it is an unaccepting society that needs normalizing, not the minority group.
Are We Too Close to Making Gattaca a Reality?by Ferris JabrScientific AmericanOctober 28th, 2013An era of market-based eugenics would exterminate any lingering notions of meritocracy. But that could never happen this side of the silver screen, right?
New Tests, Same Old Bias and Misinformationby Rachel AdamsThe Huffington PostOctober 21st, 2013October is National Down Syndrome Awareness Month, so the timing of a lazy and poorly researched New York Times piece on prenatal screening was particularly unfortunate.
Company Seeks to Make Sperm Banks Saferby Carolyn Y. JohnsonThe Boston GlobeOctober 14th, 2013A new company will test a woman’s DNA and the genes of potential sperm donors to produce a personalized list that strikes out donors who may be a bad match for about 600 genetic childhood diseases.
My Disabled Body, My Choiceby Veronica FoaleABCOctober 2nd, 2013Being disabled is a challenge in itself without society imposing restrictions on our fertility.
The Damaging Language of “Cure” and Down Syndromeby Amy Julia BeckerPatheosOctober 2nd, 2013Once again we’re hearing news of a breakthrough in research on drug therapies to enhance the cognitive processing of people with Down syndrome. And once again, the discussions seem to fixate on the controversial notion of a “cure.”
[VIDEO] Debating Embryonic Genetic Testing[With CGS Advisory Board member Francine Coeytaux]The DoctorsOctober 1st, 2013New genetic tests, including Next Generation Sequencing, can radically improve the odds of a healthy, full term pregnancy … but where do we draw the line? Hear more from The Doctors.
Studying How The Blind Perceive Race[Discusses the work of CGS's Osagie Obasogie]by Kat ChowNPRSeptember 29th, 2013Blinded by Sight: Seeing Race in the Eyes of the Blind hits shelves in November.
New Prenatal Tests Provide More Information, but Link to Problems Isn’t Clearby Lea WinermanWashington PostAugust 26th, 2013Microarray testing is now routinely offered to expectant parents when karyotyping fails to find a genetic cause for problems identified by ultrasound.
Righting a Wrong: NC to Pay Victims of Forced Sterilizationby Kimberly JohnsonAljazeera AmericaAugust 23rd, 2013Many states had eugenics programs; North Carolina will be the first to provide financial compensation.
Is Individuality the Savior of Eugenics?by Nathaniel ComfortScientific AmericanAugust 23rd, 2013Once defined as “the science of human improvement through better breeding,” eugenics has roared back into the headlines in recent weeks in both Mr. Hyde and Dr. Jekyll personae.
As Prenatal Testing For Down Syndrome Increases, So Do Concerns About Counselingby Katherine BindleyHuffington PostAugust 20th, 2013As noninvasive tests become the new norm in prenatal care, medical professionals and genetic counselors hope that women will get the guidance they need.
Could it be a 'Cure'? Breakthrough Prompts Down Syndrome Soul-Searchingby JoNel AlecciaNBC NewsAugust 11th, 2013Hailed as a “cure in a Petri dish,” the research that may help create new treatments for problems caused by Down syndrome also raises the prospect of eliminating the condition entirely.
Is Eugenics Ever Okay?by Nathaniel ComfortGenotopiaJuly 26th, 2013Recognizing that we are grasping the reins of human evolution as fast as we can raises two sets of concerns. First, “What if it doesn’t work?” Second, "What if it does?"
A Few Notes on the Invisibleby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorJuly 23rd, 2013Thoughts about disability, invisibility, Ethan Saylor's death at the hands of private police, and news that the extra chromosome that causes Down syndrome may one day be “silenced.”
Made With Loveby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJuly 22nd, 2013The first baby has been born following “next generation genetic sequencing” of IVF embryos. What are the implications?
Researchers Turn Off Down’s Syndrome Genesby Beth MoleNatureJuly 17th, 2013Silencing extra chromosome in cell cultures could lead to new treatments for the disorder.
First Baby Born After Full Genetic Screening of Embryos by Linda GeddesNew ScientistJuly 8th, 2013"There is the potential for getting an unprecedented amount of information about an embryo before it's transferred to the womb. We need to be very careful that this isn't used for trivial, non-medical reasons."
The Rise of a New Eugenicsby Lloyd Lewis and Julie ReiskinDenver PostJuly 4th, 2013Non-invasive prenatal testing technology is dangerously ahead of society's understanding of people who have Down syndrome.
The Bleak New World of Prenatal Geneticsby Marcy Darnovsky and Alexandra Minna SternThe Wall Street JournalJune 12th, 2013Like so many other powerful technologies, fetal gene tests must be used with caution and care.
EEOC Files and Settles Its First GINA-based Employment Discrimination Lawsuitby Jennifer K. WagnerGenomics Law ReportMay 13th, 2013Although individuals have brought complaints against employers alleging violations, this is the first lawsuit initiated by the EEOC to enforce the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act.
Talking Biopolitics is Back!by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesMay 13th, 2013A series of live web-based conversations with cutting-edge thinkers on the social meaning of human biotechnologies will be kicking off next week. RSVP now to join the conversations!
Dad Aims to Change Views of Down Syndrome in New Bookby Jessica Ryen DoyleFox NewsMay 11th, 2013George Estreich's new book, The Shape of the Eye, aims to change the negative connotations associated with Down syndrome.
Prenatal DNA Sequencingby Antonio RegaladoMIT Technology ReviewApril 23rd, 2013Reading the DNA of fetuses is the next frontier of the genome revolution. Do you really want to know the genetic destiny of your unborn child?
Tough Calls on Prenatal Tests by Christopher WeaverWall Street JournalApril 3rd, 2013New prenatal gene tests are reshaping care for expectant mothers, but their rapid rollout has raised fears that poorly understood results could lead to confusion among patients and doctors.
Surrogate Offered $10,000 to Abort Babyby Elizabeth CohenCNNMarch 6th, 2013A surrogate refused to have an abortion after severe abnormalities were spotted on an ultrasound and moved to Michigan, where she became the legal mother.
Meet the New Eugenics, Same as the Old Eugenicsby Gina Maranto, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesMarch 4th, 2013According to a new wave of eugenic advocacy, “we” have a “moral obligation” to enhance future generations.
Selling the Story: Down Syndrome, Fetal Gene Testing, and The Today Showby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesFebruary 28th, 2013On The Today Show, a couple learns the results of a noninvasive prenatal test. Left unanswered are questions about the effects of new technologies, and how those technologies are sold.
A Call for International Prohibition of Forced Genital-Normalizing Surgery and Sterilizationby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesFebruary 21st, 2013A new report from the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture focuses on human rights abuses in health-care settings, and bolsters LGBTQI activists in their fight against involuntary sterilizations and genital-normalizing surgeries.
Parents of Down's Syndrome Woman, 21, Can NOT Have her Sterilised, Rules Judge by Daniel MillerDaily MailFebruary 16th, 2013In a landmark ruling in London, the sterilization of a woman with Down's syndrome at her parents' request was ruled 'disproportionate' and in violation of her human rights.
New Study Finds Number of Multiple Births Affected by Congenital Anomalies has Doubled in the Last 30 YearsBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and GynaecologyFebruary 6th, 2013The number of birth defects arising from multiple births has almost doubled since the 1980s, suggests a new study compiled over a 24-year period across 14 European countries.
Hilary Rose: The Problem with the Bioscience Industry – Videoby Hilary RoseThe GuardianJanuary 30th, 2013Hilary Rose, co-author of Genes, Cells and Brains, argues that we should treat the medical claims made for genetic research with suspicion.
Fetal Genome Screening Could Prove TragicScientific AmericanJanuary 18th, 2013Parents will soon be able to have their fetus' genes mapped. Without proper guidance, they might decide to end the pregnancy based on a misguided reading of the genetic tea leaves.
It's Legal For Some Insurers To Discriminate Based On Genesby David SchultzNPRJanuary 17th, 2013The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act has a loophole: It only applies to health insurance. It says nothing about life insurance, disability insurance or long-term-care insurance.
N.C. House will Consider Eugenics Payouts Againby Patrick GannonStar News OnlineDecember 13th, 2012The North Carolina House will again pursue legislation in 2013 to compensate residents sterilized decades ago by a state-sanctioned board.
Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing: Is This the Brave New World We Want?by Alexandra Minna SternThe Huffington PostDecember 11th, 2012Several companies have recently unveiled non-invasive prenatal tests for use among "high-risk" women, but the history of prenatal testing in America suggests that a path to routinization is all but assured.
Tesla, Eugenics And Rationalizing Dehumanizationby Alex KnappForbesNovember 19th, 2012Famed inventor Nikola Tesla was an ardent supporter of eugenics, predicting universally established eugenics by the year 2100.
Anatomy of a Webpage, Part 3: Selling “Peace of Mind”by George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorNovember 13th, 2012New developments in prenatal tests are triggering aggressive - and often misleading - marketing. Thankfully, there are signs of push-back from a society that is learning that people are more than their syndromes.
The Eugenic Impulseby Nathaniel ComfortThe Chronicle of Higher EducationNovember 12th, 2012Medical geneticists are working on weeding out disease, but what counts as disease is murky and the slide from prevention to enhancement loses friction fast.
Inquiry Into Practice of Sterilising Disabled Womenby Tom NightingaleABC News (Australia)November 1st, 2012A Senate committee is looking into the controversial practice of sterilising disabled people, which is still legal in Australia.
Colman Chadam, California Boy, Ordered To Transfer Schools For Carrying Cystic Fibrosis Gene Huffington PostOctober 18th, 2012An 11-year-old has been ordered to leave his current school because of his genetic makeup. His parents are taking the issue to court.
Anatomy of a Webpage, Part 2: Preconception Servicesby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorOctober 17th, 2012People living with genetic diseases become medicalized abstractions of risk and defect in the slick marketing of fetal gene tests. More than a matter of semantics, such simplification has negative consequences for all.
Neural Stem Cells Successfully Implanted into the Brains of Four Boysby Jon BardinLos Angeles TimesOctober 12th, 2012Scientists have performed the first successful neural stem cell transplant into the brains of four boys with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.
We are More Than the Sum of our Genesby Stella YoungRamp UpOctober 9th, 2012As a disabled feminist, I'm often asked about my views on medical procedures like pre-natal screening and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.
Prenatal Test Presents Dilemmas to Expectant Mothersby Maureen SalamonUS NewsSeptember 28th, 2012Some women label information about fetal chromosomal abnormalities "toxic knowledge" they wish they hadn't received, a small new study shows.
Complete Video Now Online for Eugenics in California: A Legacy of the Past?by Center for Genetics and SocietyBiopolitical TimesSeptember 28th, 2012A video recording of a public event at Berkeley School of Law about the legacies of eugenics in California.
Anatomy of a Webpage: Marketing Fetal Gene Tests and Sequenom’s MaterniT21by George EstreichBiopolitical Times guest contributorSeptember 24th, 2012In the age of genomics, whole-chromosome conditions are only the beginning. Our ability to sample fetal DNA from maternal blood means that not only Down syndrome, but before long any condition with a genetic component, any “risk,” can be forecast.
Ich Bin ein Scroungerby Judith LevineSeven DaysSeptember 21st, 2012Every one of us is, or will be, disabled in some way. Must we all be Paralympians?
Bioethicist Pushes Us Toward Our Eugenic Dutyby Anna Hamilton, Biopolitical Times Guest ContributorSeptember 6th, 2012A professor of ethics takes his campaign for "breeding better babies" to the Reader's Digest.
Health Ministry to Expand Pregnant Women's Genetic Testing Subsidies by Yaron KelnerYNet NewsAugust 31st, 2012A new initiative in Israel will subsidize advanced genetic testing for pregnant women, providing prenatal diagnosis of genetic abnormalities.
Will Joseph Merrick, aka the Elephant Man, Ever Rest in Peace?by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesAugust 22nd, 2012Scientists plan to extract DNA from the skeleton of Joseph Merrick in hopes that they can finally explain the cause of his disfigurement. What are the ethical implications?
The Dangers of Fetal Engineering by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesAugust 17th, 2012A recent study considers the troubling off-label use of a risky drug in pregnant women whose baby girls may not be born with normal-looking genitals.
Eugenics in California: A Legacy of the Past?by Center for Genetics and SocietyBiopolitical TimesAugust 15th, 2012A free public event at UC Berkeley will consider the long history of eugenics in California and explore continuities and discontinuities in the uses and misuses of genetic ideas and practices.
As Prices for Prenatal Genome Sequencing Tests Fall, Researchers Worry About Consequences for Families in a Real-Life 'Gattaca' by Makini BriceMedical DailyAugust 13th, 2012Genome sequencing of fetuses would drastically increase the volume and scope of prenatal data, but its meaning would be unclear.
Clinical Trial Is Favorable for a Prenatal Gene Testby Andrew PollackThe New York TimesAugust 8th, 2012A new method of prenatal testing that can detect more genetic problems in a fetus than ever before could be headed toward wider use after encouraging results from a clinical trial.
Rolling the Dice of a Genetic Legacyby Ellen Painter DollarThe New York TimesJuly 20th, 2012A mother with brittle bone disease chooses to accept that risk for her children.
One of Five Million: Contemplating Fertility Treatment and Embryo Selectionby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJuly 12th, 2012Five million people have been born using in vitro fertilization. Though the technology has become safer and less expensive, it warrants attention because of the open door it provides for embryo selection.
Couples Use IVF to Pick Genesby Julia MedewThe AgeJuly 3rd, 2012Fertile women with genes that predispose them to breast and ovarian cancers are using preimplantation genetic diagnosis to select embryos without the genes.
North Carolina Survivors of Eugenic Sterilization are Passed Over Againby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 28th, 2012The North Carolina Senate has turned down compensation for living victims of the state-sponsored forced sterilization program that continued into the 1970s.
Designer Babies in Popular Cultureby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 21st, 2012The Whitest Kids U’Know’s comedic parody of genetic counseling is reminiscent of a similar scene in GATTACA.
Payments for Victims of Eugenics Are Shelvedby Kim SeversonThe New York TimesJune 20th, 2012North Carolina’s effort to compensate people who were sterilized under a widespread eugenics program that stretched into the 1970s all but died in the State Senate on Wednesday.
When California Decided Who Could Have Children and Who Could Notby Jeremy RosenbergLos Angeles TimesJune 18th, 2012California's "Asexualization Act" of 1909 gave the go-ahead for the state to sterilize more than 20,000 men and women against their will.
Genetic Testing For Color Vision Makes Commercial Debut for Military Applicationsby Dan BucklandmedGadgetJune 12th, 2012Possibly heralding a new era in the use of genetic testing for hiring decisions, Genevolve recently announced a new “military grade” test for inherited color blindness.
Genetic Screening of Unborn Babies 'May be Inaccurate'by Nick CollinsThe Telegraph (UK)June 7th, 2012The blood test that may be used to routinely screen foetuses for more than 3,000 genetic conditions raises "many ethical questions" and is not a clear indicator of how severe a disability may be.
N.C. House Approves Measure Compensating Victims of Eugenics Programsby Lynn BonnerNews ObserverJune 5th, 2012In a 86-31 vote, the state House approved a measure that will compensate people sterilized by a state authority over four decades ago.
NC Bill Supports Compensation for Eugenics Victimsby Martha WagoonerNew ObserverMay 16th, 2012Victims of North Carolina's decades-long forced sterilization program would receive $50,000 each under a bill filed Wednesday that would make the state the first to compensate people who lost their child-bearing abilities under the once-common practice.
The Real Chen Guangcheng Story: Forced Abortion, Eugenics, and the One-Child Policyby Daniel SharpBiopolitical TimesMay 16th, 2012Amidst focus on the domestic and international political aspects of the Chen Guangcheng affair, the media have missed the real issue: forced abortion and forced sterilization in China.
Will Gattaca Come True?[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Mara HvistendahlSlateApril 27th, 2012Noninvasive, early fetal tests for sex, paternity, and chromosomal conditions will change pregnancy dramatically — and raise tricky ethical questions.
$10.3 Million for Eugenics Compensation by Herbert L. WhiteCharlotte PostApril 25th, 2012North Caroliona Governor Bev Perdue’s proposed budget will include $10.3 million for people involuntarily sterilized by the state.
North Carolina Leads the Way in Compensation for Eugenic Sterilization Victimsby Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesMarch 22nd, 2012Will North Carolina’s efforts to compensate victims of eugenic sterilization encourage other states to follow suit?
California's Dark Legacy of Forced Sterilizationsby Elizabeth Cohen and John BonifieldCNNMarch 15th, 2012North Carolina's recent confrontation with its eugenic history raises the question: Will California move to confront its own eugenic history?
New Thriller about Eugenics, “the Dirty Little Secret of the Anglo-American Intellectual Elite”by Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesMarch 15th, 2012How should we understand the attraction of eugenics for liberals and leftists in the early twentieth century?
Sterilized by North Carolina, She Felt Raped Once Moreby David ZucchinoLos Angeles TimesJanuary 25th, 2012North Carolina's recent move to compensate victims of sterilization program isn't enough to resolve the pain of the troubled past.
Payment Set for Those Sterilized in Programby Kim SeversonNew York TimesJanuary 11th, 2012The task force assigned the difficult task of deciding how much to compensate the victims of a North Carolina sterilization program settled on a number on Tuesday.
Genetic Discrimination and Ron Paulby Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesJanuary 9th, 2012Genetic discrimination in Canada today is similar to what the US faced prior to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, opposed by presidential candidate Ron Paul.
Stem Cell Fraud: A 60 Minutes Investigationby Scott Pelley60 MinutesJanuary 8th, 2012The Internet is full of websites selling unproven stem cell treatments for incurable illnesses. Correspondent Scott Pelley investigates.
Unnatural Selection: Is Evolving Reproductive Technology Ushering in a New Age of Eugenics? [Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Carolyn AbrahamThe Globe and MailJanuary 7th, 2012Modern day assisted reproduction offers a whole new approach to baby-making, one that gives people an unprecedented power to preview, and pick, the genetic traits of their children.
Health Insurance and ‘Genetic Discrimination’: Are Rules Needed? by Carly WeeksThe Globe and MailJanuary 1st, 2012Medical advances mean we can now test for some disease markers – but experts fear this progress will result in insurers and employers using genetic information to deny coverage and benefits.
Thousands Sterilized, a State Weighs Restitutionby Kim SeversonNew York TimesDecember 9th, 2011A task force is calculating North Carolina's obligation to the estimated 7600 victims of its eugenics program from 1933 to 1977, but the issues go deeper than just a dollar amount.
Francis Galton's Novel about Eugenicsby Michael MarshallNew ScientistDecember 5th, 2011The unpublished novel of eugenicist Francis Galton has been published in fragments by the University College London on the 100th anniversary of his death.
Genetic Testing for Down Syndrome: What It Can and Cannot Tell You by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesNovember 10th, 2011Sequenom's new genetic test predicts the presence of Down syndrome at an earlier stage in pregnancy, but parents need more information to accompany the diagnosis.
Sex Selection Game-Changer? New Fetal Gene Test Reveals Sex at 7 Weeksby Doug PetBiopolitical TimesNovember 9th, 2011New non-invasive prenatal testing will enable parents to know a fetus's sex, Down's status, and possibly other traits dramatically earlier in a pregnancy.
Prenatal Blood Test for Down Syndrome Availableby Shari RoanLos Angeles TimesOctober 19th, 2011Women can now choose a non-invasive method of prenatal testing for Down syndrome.
The quest for the perfect babyby Meir BrezisHaaretz [Israel]Should parents be able to sue doctors for failing to prevent the birth of a child with a defect? That is a question facing the [Israeli] Supreme Court, which has been asked to recognize 'wrongful birth.'
The Blade Runner's Personal Victoryby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesAugust 31st, 2011Oscar Pistorius, running on two prosthetic legs, reached the semifinals of the track and field World Championship 400m race, encouraging some potentially important discussions.
More S'poreans Going Abroad for IVF to Choose Baby's GenderAsia OneAugust 22nd, 2011More and more Singaporeans are heading overseas for medical procedures which allow them to choose their babies' gender.
If You Really, Really Wanted a Girl...by Pam BelluckNew York TimesAugust 20th, 2011Tests using DNA to determine a fetus’s sex were shown to be remarkably accurate, but the tests also raise ethical questions: whether couples will abort fetuses of an unwanted sex.
Council for Responsible Genetics Explores New Fetal Gene Test Methodby Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesJuly 6th, 2011A recent report by the Council for Responsible Genetics assesses non-invasive prenatal genetic diagnosis and emerging ethical questions.
Could prenatal DNA testing open Pandora's box?[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Malcolm RitterThe Associated PressJune 12th, 2011Some ethics experts say it's time to start talking now about what early-pregnancy fetal gene tests could mean for parents and society.
Comfort or conflict: Earlier Down syndrome testby Malcolm RitterSan Francisco ChronicleJune 11th, 2011Companies are racing to market a blood test that could detect Down syndrome very early in pregnancy.
Annals of Human Genetics Does A Little “House Cleaning.” Sort Of.by Osagie ObasogieBiopolitical TimesMay 19th, 2011In a former incarnation, a well-respected scholarly journal promoted eugenics. It has now put its archives online.
Exoskeleton Helps UCB Student Walk for Graduation: Disability Justice or Cyborg Fantasy?by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesMay 18th, 2011A new invention for paraplegics allows a UCB grad to walk to accept his diploma, but the device comes with disability clichés and transhumanist potential.
One Step Closer to Designer BabiesNew Noninvasive Prenatal Genetic Testing Could Change Human Pregnancy Foreverby Marcy DarnovskyScience ProgressApril 22nd, 2011A new approach to testing the genes of early-stage fetuses could radically alter the experience of pregnancy and parenting from as early as five weeks, leading to a potentially dangerous moral quandary.
Pre-pregnancy genetic screening backed by government advisers[United Kingdom]by James MeikleThe Guardian (UK)April 6th, 2011Tests will allow couples or individuals to assess their own risk of carrying genetic conditions such as cystic fibrosis.
Eugenics lawmaker resignsby Shira SchoenbergConcord MonitorMarch 15th, 2011State Rep. Martin Harty resigned yesterday, facing outrage from constituents, colleagues and strangers over comments he made endorsing eugenics for what he called "defective people."
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