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About Arts, Culture & Human Biotechnology


Mention genetic technologies or human enhancement to the average person, and more likely than not their first response will reference the 1997 film Gattaca or Aldous Huxley's 1932 classic, Brave New World. Art and popular culture profoundly influence how we think about ourselves and each other, and portrayals of human biotechnologies are likely to affect how we think about future social arrangements. Ultimately this can shape the policy decisions we make today.

The social meanings of human biotechnologies have been pondered in film, television shows, painting, and other visual arts; in speculative fiction, novels, and children's books, and other literature; in performance and experiential art; and even in a project that produced a living rabbit engineered to glow in the dark.



FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancementby Jonathan ChernoguzBiopolitical TimesNovember 12th, 2014The documentary produced and directed by Regan Brashear is receiving a new round of well-deserved positive attention around the world.
Hwang Woo-suk Reaches the Silver Screenby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesOctober 2nd, 2014A new movie opening in Korea is explicitly about how the notorious cloning and stem-cell fraud was revealed, though the names of the principals have been changed.
Monument Seeks to End Silence on Killings of the Disabled by the Nazisby Melissa EddyThe New York TimesSeptember 2nd, 2014Among the last to have their suffering publicly acknowledged, the mentally ill and intellectually disabled victims of direct medical killings by the Nazis now have their own memorial in the heart of Berlin.
"We're All One of Troy's Babies": A Celebration of Troy Dusterby Victoria Massie, Biopolitical Times guest contributorAugust 21st, 2014On Friday, August 15th, I was one among a multitude of people finding a seat in Booth Auditorium at UC Berkeley Law School for the event “Celebrating Troy Duster.”
As Data Overflows Online, Researchers Grapple With Ethicsby Vindu GoelThe New York TimesAugust 12th, 2014It’s the frontier of social science — experiments on people who may never even know they are subjects of study, let alone explicitly consent.
The Perfect 46: A “Science Factual” Film about our Near Futureby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJuly 10th, 2014A new science fiction film called “a sort of prequel to Gattaca” highlights the rise and fall of a genetic startup that analyzes people’s genomes to assess their ability to produce disease-free children.
Orphan Black: The Best Show You’ve Never Seenby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesMay 29th, 2014A BBC America television series about clones is seriously good.
Charging Into the Minefield of Genes and Racial Differenceby Arthur AllenThe New York TimesMay 15th, 2014Few areas of science have contributed more to human misery than the study of racial difference. In A Troublesome Inheritance, Nicholas Wade argues that scientists need to get over their hang-ups and jump in.
Transcendence: See it for its Cultural Relevance, Not its Plot Lineby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesMay 1st, 2014Transcendence won’t win you over with its dialogue or love scenes, but it’s a great springboard for pondering what quickly approaching developments in artificial intelligence, synthetic biology, and regenerative medicine may actually mean for society.
DNA Dreamsby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesApril 9th, 2014The fascinating documentary film that explores the inner workings of BGI Shenzhen, “the world’s largest genomics organization,” is now available in full on YouTube.
To Understand Science, Study Historyby Alejandra DubcovskyThe Chronicle of Higher EducationFebruary 24th, 2014Teaching history to students who plan to be doctors, scientists, or engineers forces them to lift their heads beyond the lab bench or the clipboard. It gives them a sensitivity that only the humanities can teach.
Bodies and Babies Commodified: A Review of Breedersby Gina Maranto, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesFebruary 17th, 2014Breeders serves as a necessary corrective to the rosy PR the surrogacy industry puts out.
DNA Dreamingby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJanuary 13th, 2014A new documentary looks at the Chinese company that styles itself "the world’s largest genomics organization,” and its hunt for the genetic basis of intelligence.
Top Science Longreads of 2013by Ed YongNational GeographicDecember 23rd, 2013I’m really optimistic about the future for long, deep, rich science reporting. There are more places that are publishing it, more ways of finding it, and a seemingly huge cadre of people who are writing it well.
‘Generation Cryo’: How A New Generation Is Redefining Familyby Marisa PeñalozaWBURDecember 17th, 2013Thousands of children are conceived using sperm and egg donors every year, a group large enough to entice MTV to air “Generation Cryo.”
Techno-Libertarians and The Circleby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesDecember 5th, 2013The new novel by Dave Eggers is a provocative romp and a missed opportunity that does, however, raise a lot of very interesting questions about Silicon Valley culture.
Building Better Humansby Zaineb MohammedEast Bay ExpressDecember 4th, 2013A new documentary looks at the impacts of human enhancement technologies. "I totally get the temptation," says the filmmaker. "But what are we fixing? Who is the problem?"
What Huxley Knewby J. P. HarpigniesLetter to the New York TimesNovember 24th, 2013Huxley’s assembly-line baby factories were an exaggeration, but it’s a mistake to dismiss too quickly his fears about the genetic manipulation of the species.
‘Delivery Man’: 9 Sperm-Donation Questions You’re Too Embarrassed to Ask by Eliana DocktermanTimeNovember 22nd, 2013With a new movie, MTV series, and book, sperm donation stories are pervading pop culture right now. Experts answer 9 questions about what's really going on.
Future Past: Disability, Eugenics, & Brave New Worldsby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesNovember 7th, 2013A public symposium held on November 1 at San Francisco State University provided a rare and important opportunity to engage with the historical and ongoing implications of eugenic ideologies and practices for people with disabilities.
Are Roboticists Ignoring the Consequences?by Judith LevineSeven DaysNovember 6th, 2013Thanks to innovations such as “low-cost sensors” and “new algorithms,” robots are starting to look like us, move like us and react like us. And if the worshippers of technology have their way, they will replace us.
Grow Your Own: Where Scientists and Artists are Shaking up Creationby Oliver WainwrightThe GuardianOctober 27th, 2013From armpit brie to banana flavoured E.coli, artists and bio-hackers have teamed up to push the frontiers of 'synthetic biology' in a new exhibition.
Review: Genetic Explanations: Sense and Nonsenseby Evan CharneyLogosOctober 24th, 2013This timely and important collection brings together prominent geneticists, biologists, medical researchers, psychologists, philosophers, and historians to engage in “debunking as positive science.”
An Insider’s Antidote for Dangerous Stem Cell Hypeby Bernadette TanseyXconomyOctober 22nd, 2013Paul Knoepfler’s new book is a scientific primer and a paean to the promise of stem cell research, but also a warning to vulnerable patients who prematurely look to stem cell therapy as a last-ditch hope for a cure.
At the End of the Slippery Slope: Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam Trilogyby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorSeptember 24th, 2013Atwood says her trilogy "invents nothing we haven’t already invented or started to invent" — suggesting that though her work is fiction and not a tract, she also intends to do far more than entertain.
23andMe, Myself, and Iby Nathaniel ComfortGenotopiaAugust 7th, 201323andMe's new ad will begin airing shortly on cable TV, and it's all about "me."
Edge of the Map: An Experiment in Science and in Theaterby Alice WexlerUCLA Center for the Study of WomenAugust 6th, 2013A group of Harvard students created a theater piece called Edge of the Map, a collage based on real-life and invented scenarios involving ethical and social dilemmas in genetics.
The Devil in Mr. Nelson: Cryonics and Nightmare Comediesby Grant Shoffstall, Biopolitical Times guest contributorJuly 25th, 2013The upcoming film Freezing People is Easy will chronicle the saga of Robert Nelson, co-founder of the long-defunct Cryonics Society of California. Will it also shed light on the social history of cryonics and the scandals associated with it?
Nest Eggby Teresa ChinHyphen MagazineJuly 19th, 2013Asian women command a high price for their eggs, but is it worth the risk? A look at several different personal accounts.
From Suspects to the Spitterati: A collision of power, profit, and privacyby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 27th, 2013DNA collection is increasingly ubiquitous, and the push for access to genetic information is gaining momentum. What questions should we be considering?
Angelina Jolie, Breast Cancer, and You: How to Make the Right Decisions for YOUR Healthby Judy NorsigianOur Bodies Our BlogMay 17th, 2013It is now up to women’s health advocates to ensure that media coverage and public debate don't offer false information or false hope.
A Note of Caution: Freezing Eggs Is Not a Silver Bullet for Age-Related Infertilityby Miriam ZollRH Reality CheckMay 15th, 2013A $4 billion industry is driving public discourse about often unproven discoveries through a lens that focuses attention on the minority of successes rather than the whole messy, complicated story.
Talking Biopolitics is Back!by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesMay 13th, 2013A series of live web-based conversations with cutting-edge thinkers on the social meaning of human biotechnologies will be kicking off next week. RSVP now to join the conversations!
Dad Aims to Change Views of Down Syndrome in New Bookby Jessica Ryen DoyleFox NewsMay 11th, 2013George Estreich's new book, The Shape of the Eye, aims to change the negative connotations associated with Down syndrome.
On Vampires and Chromosomesby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesMay 9th, 2013The vampires of the Twilight books have superpowers due to two extra chromosomes. In our fang-free human life, however, having extra chromosomes is not usually seen as a plus.
Never Mind Humanityby Ari SchulmanThe American ConservativeApril 25th, 2013Ray Kurzweil's new book might be dismissed on the bluster of its title alone, were it not the latest work from the famed futurist, inventor, and artificial-intelligence pioneer who has been hired as a director of engineering at Google.
Sofia Vergara Freezing Her [Perfect, Perfect, Perfect] Eggsby Diane ToberBiopolitical TimesApril 4th, 2013Several celebrities have announced they’re doing it. But social egg freezing is nothing to be taken lightly.
Book Review: Transhumanist Dreams and Dystopian Nightmaresby John GallowayBioNewsMarch 11th, 2013Some say we should use genetic science not simply to ameliorate the human predicament but to transcend it. Of course this raises the issue of what 'best' means and, in any event, who decides.
The Gattaca App for Your Smartphoneby Abby Lippman, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesMarch 6th, 2013Will Malaysia lead the way in cell phone apps that access your genetic data, and if so what comes next?
Selling the Story: Down Syndrome, Fetal Gene Testing, and The Today Showby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesFebruary 28th, 2013On The Today Show, a couple learns the results of a noninvasive prenatal test. Left unanswered are questions about the effects of new technologies, and how those technologies are sold.
To Claim Someone has 'Viking Ancestors' is no Better than Astrologyby Mark ThomasThe Guardian February 25th, 2013The truth about direct-to-consumer ancestry tests is that there is little scientific substance to most of them and they are better thought of as genetic astrology.
Al Gore: Human Biotech is a “Driver of Global Change”by Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesFebruary 21st, 2013In his recently released best-seller The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change, Al Gore calls for protocols to guide decisions about human genetic modification.
Book Review: Anne Pollock’s Medicating Race[Quotes CGS's Osagie Obasogie]by Colin HalversonSomatosphereJanuary 7th, 2013Medicating Race is a meditation on the history and present state of racialized (specifically African American) forms of heart disease.
Genes, Cells and Brains by Hilary Rose and Steven Rose - Reviewby Steven PooleThe Guardian (UK)December 19th, 2012A fascinating, lucid and angry book; a strong exposé of the hype surrounding genetics and neuroscience.
Review: Bioethics: All That Matters by Donna Dickensonby Gina Maranto, Biopolitical Times guest contributorDecember 13th, 2012This lively and accessible guide to the ethical implications of biotechnology asks how the field promotes or undermines social equality.
Why Your DNA is a Goldmine for Marketers[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Carolyn AbrahamThe Globe and MailDecember 12th, 2012In the ever-growing field of personal-data mining, marketing firms already latch on to details far beyond the sphere of names and postal codes; DNA may well be the next frontier.
The Definitive Book on the Strange History of BiDilby Osagie ObasogieBiopolitical TimesDecember 6th, 2012Jonathan Kahn's new Race In A Bottle is an extraordinary account of the birth, life, and death(?) of the first drug to receive FDA approval for a specific racial group.
Of Monsters and Menby George Estreich, Biopolitical Times guest contributorBiopolitical TimesNovember 29th, 2012The Amazing Spider-Man’s focus on genetic modification is more than incidental.
"Live Nude Eggs" and Other Personal Accounts by Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesNovember 21st, 2012Recent first-person accounts by egg donors shed light on the complicated terrain these women face.
Clones and Cloud Atlasby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesNovember 13th, 2012Of the many characters in Cloud Atlas that explore what it means to be human, the most eloquent is a genetically engineered clone.
Transhumanist Web Series Likely to Disappoint Transhumanistsby Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesSeptember 6th, 2012A new web-based digital series looks at a transhumanist future with an eye to social justice and finds it frightening.
Will Joseph Merrick, aka the Elephant Man, Ever Rest in Peace?by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesAugust 22nd, 2012Scientists plan to extract DNA from the skeleton of Joseph Merrick in hopes that they can finally explain the cause of his disfigurement. What are the ethical implications?
Mentos: Court Jester for Singapore's Eugenic Regime? by Mike Beitiks, Biopolitical Times guest contributorAugust 17th, 2012An attempt at buzz marketing makes an odd, albeit accidental, endorsement of eugenic nationalism.
Pride: In Your Genes? by Daniel SharpBiopolitical TimesJune 28th, 2012A new "gay gene" study and a strange float at the Pride Parade present a context to reflect on genetic determinism and the meaning of pride.
Bay Area Artist Looks to Biopolitical Issues for Inspirationby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesJune 7th, 2012Bay Area artist Doug Minkler addresses concerns about synthetic biology and the corporatization of scientific research in his socially conscious posters.
Another Commercial for Dog Cloningby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesMay 25th, 2012A TV network seems to be attempting a proof of PT Barnum's famous proposition.
Mara Hvistendahl's Unnatural Selection Finalist for Pulitzer by Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesApril 26th, 2012Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men has been cited as one of the best books of 2011 by many publications, and has now been recognized by the Pulitzer Board as a finalist for the General Nonfiction award.
New Thriller about Eugenics, “the Dirty Little Secret of the Anglo-American Intellectual Elite”by Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesMarch 15th, 2012How should we understand the attraction of eugenics for liberals and leftists in the early twentieth century?
Assisted Reproduction Technologies Hit Prime Time by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesFebruary 23rd, 2012This month’s episodes of Glee and Modern Family – two of the most popular prime time television shows – featured central characters contemplating assisted reproductive technologies.
Biopolitical Times Mourns the Passing of Charles WeinerBiopolitical TimesFebruary 7th, 2012History of science scholar Charles Weiner passed away January 28, 2012. We reflect on his contributions to the field.
How to Use $90? Buy a Gene Ring, or Burn for Warmth?by Doug PetBiopolitical TimesDecember 8th, 2011ConnectMyDNA is marketing the “Gene Ring,” which it baselessly claims can reveal your genetic compatibility to other Gene Ring purchasers, and your ties to foreign countries.
Dystopian "In Time" and Inequalities in Our Timeby Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesDecember 1st, 2011The dystopian future of Andrew Niccol's new film, In Time, resonates with current inequalities.
Celebrating Dorothy Roberts and Fatal Inventionby Doug PetBiopolitical TimesOctober 6th, 2011The Center for Genetics and Society co-sponsored two events celebrating Dorothy Roberts' new book, Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-Create Race in the Twenty-First Century.
Celebrating Our Bodies Ourselvesby Doug PetBiopolitical TimesSeptember 29th, 2011A series of public events marks the 40th anniversary of Our Bodies Ourselves.
Turning 40, Going Globalby Gina Maranto, Biopolitical Times guest contributorSeptember 28th, 2011Born in Boston, Our Bodies, Ourselves has become an international force for women's rights.
X-Men Recharge: People in the Margin or Powers on a Pedestal?by Brendan ParentBiopolitical TimesJune 22nd, 2011Last week's release of 'X-Men: First Class" may be cause for questioning the whole premise of the X-Men series: Would people marked by genetic advantages actually experience group discrimination?
An Uncomfortable Synthesis of Art and Biologyby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesMay 26th, 2011The Natural History Museum in Vienna is hosting the Bio:Fiction Science, Art & Film Festival, which features work about synthetic biology.
The loaded ethics of DNA hackingby Marcus WohlsenSalonApril 9th, 2011A growing number of amateur scientists are tinkering with genetics in their homes. Is this a recipe for disaster?
3-Month Pregnancies for Hire: A Pure Fantasy? by Doug PetBiopolitical TimesMarch 24th, 2011Tze Chun’s short film Silver Sling depicts a grim future for commercial surrogacy, and reflects on a grim present.
New film depicts a genetically engineered, anti-gay future by Doug PetBiopolitical TimesMarch 17th, 2011Nisha Ganatra’s Beholder depicts a future in which children are genetically designed and homosexuality is screened out of the population.
Mother Jones’ Illustrated Epigenetic Primerby Jillian TheilBiopolitical TimesFebruary 10th, 2011Mother Jones features “The Illustrated Guide to Epigenetics.”
Pros at Prose: DTC Poetry Slamby Jillian TheilBiopolitical TimesJanuary 13th, 2011A poetry contest sponsored by 23andMe inspires an outpouring of counter-verse that proves to be both entertaining and thought-provoking.
Your Next Book: Genetic Justiceby Doug PetBiopolitical TimesJanuary 13th, 2011A new book about the use of DNA-based techniques in the criminal justice system is a biopolitical must-read.
Turning Geek Into Chicby Jed LipinskiThe New York Times December 19th, 2010GenSpace members, who call themselves "garage biologists" or "biohackers," are trying to do for modern biology what hackers did for computers: turning geek into chic.
Role-playing transhumanism: Not just a gameby Doug PetOctober 7th, 2010“Deus Ex”: A transhumanist-themed video game series presenting a balanced picture of the human enhancement issue? Nope.
The Genetic Gist of JIMby Jillian TheilBiopolitical TimesOctober 7th, 2010A new independent film with a timeless message.
Mary Shelley and the Modern Worldby Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesSeptember 22nd, 2010Out of the Shadows, a new novel by Joanne Rendell, touches on several current genetic issues, and connects them with the author of Frankenstein.
Never Let Me...Clone?by Jillian TheilBiopolitical TimesSeptember 16th, 2010New film explores a world with reproductive clones raised for organ donation.
ART and Art in the Movies 2010by Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesAugust 25th, 2010Assisted reproductive technologies are a repeating theme this year in Hollywood, and the results seem to be decidedly mixed.
Wise Words from a Comedic Criticby Doug PetBiopolitical TimesJuly 14th, 2010Sultan of satirical news, Stephen Colbert regularly calls attention to important biopolitical issues. Within many of his uproarious commentaries and interviews are meaningful insights.
A Real-Life Version of “My Sister’s Keeper”by Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesMay 6th, 2010"The Match" is an emotionally compelling and thought-provoking account of a family's decision to create a genetically matched baby to treat their sick daughter.
Strange New World[Book Review]by Jeanette WintersonThe New York TimesSeptember 20th, 2009Margaret Atwood's new novel, "The Year of the Flood," takes place in the same bioengineered world as her 2003 work of speculative fiction, "Oryx and Crake."
Michael Jackson, cloning, and assisted reproduction: The trivial and the troublingby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesJuly 13th, 2009Michael Jackson was “obsessed” with cloning himself, and used assisted reproduction to produce three children “crafted to be `white’ enough to match [his] artfully devised if pathetically alienated image of himself.”
GATTACA Framing in the Newsby Osagie ObasogieBiopolitical TimesJune 18th, 2009While the media hype machine has overwhelmingly pushed the “science can only benefit society” narrative, we also have to be critical of premature hints at doomsday scenarios. However subtle and sporadic, they can be just as troublesome.
Fertility Drug Makes the Big Leaguesby Osagie ObasogieBiopolitical TimesMay 9th, 2009The suspension of LA Dodgers' Manny Ramirez sheds light on how hormonal drugs for egg collection are used.
Bio-Dad documentary available onlineby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesMarch 26th, 2009A compelling look at the "emerging political battle" of people conceived with assisted reproduction to know their genetic origins.
Cloning Keira Knightleyby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesMarch 26th, 2009The British star will play the central character in a film adaptation of the 2005 novel "Never Let Me Go."
War Against the Weak – The Documentaryby Osagie ObasogieBiopolitical TimesJanuary 27th, 2009Edwin Black’s award-winning book on the history and modern implications of the American Eugenics Movement is about to hit the silver screen.
This Year’s Stocking Stuffersby Osagie ObasogieBiopolitical TimesDecember 15th, 2008What do you give the people on your holiday shopping list who have everything? Themselves!
Willy Wonka and the cloning factoryby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesJune 5th, 2008Is Lou Hawthorne biotech's Willy Wonka?
So you think you own your body?by Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesMay 1st, 2008"No human should ever be reduced to the sum of their body parts."
Are We Headed for a Sci-Fi Dystopia? by Marcy DarnovskyAlterNetMarch 22nd, 2008Those in Gen X and Gen Y who ponder the prospect of a repro-genetic dystopia think of Gattaca. Last week's release of a collector's edition of the 1997 film unavoidably prompts us to measure ourselves against its "not-too-distant future" of genetic castes and DNA-based discrimination. Has our world become more like Gattaca than it was a decade ago?
Making Waves, Practicing Wisdomby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesJanuary 21st, 2008A new memoir by Charlie Halpern includes an eloquent call for bringing "wisdom of a high order" to the challenges of the new human biotechnologies.
New Book Makes Dangerous Claim That Inequality Is Geneticby Jesse ReynoldsAlternet.orgJanuary 18th, 2008Gregory Clark's book "A Farewell to Alms" suggests that race- and class-based inequality is inherent - perhaps even deserved.
ColorLines Features Race and Biotechby Marcy DarnovskyBiopolitical TimesSeptember 24th, 2007Three terrific articles in "the national newsmagazine on race and politics."
The Rebirth of a Nation?by Osagie K. ObasogieColorlines (Sept / Oct 2007)September 19th, 2007300 is arguably the most racially charged movie since D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation. Closer inspection reveals a subtler, yet similarly troubling idea that has gone largely unnoticed: 300's unapologetic glorification of eugenics.
Beam Me Up!by Jesse ReynoldsBiopolitical TimesJuly 26th, 2007Today, actor William Shatner gives a keynote presentation at the annual meeting of the World Transhumanist Association. Will he remind his technophilic audience that, in the Star Trek canon, the development of human genetic engineering on Earth led to a globally-devastating conflict, the Eugenics Wars?
WWJD – What Would James (Cameron) Do?by Osagie K. ObasogieBiopolitical TimesMarch 6th, 2007James Cameron is quite accustomed to casting big stars in his films. Yet many were surprised when Cameron took his legendary casting to the next level by setting his eyes on Jesus – yes, Jesus – as his next leading man.
Jesus Family Tomb Believed Foundby Jennifer ViegasDiscovery NewsFebruary 25th, 2007New scientific evidence, including DNA analysis conducted at one of the world's foremost molecular genetics laboratories, as well as studies by leading scholars, suggests a 2,000-year-old Jerusalem tomb could have once held the remains of Jesus.
Interview with Marcy Darnovskyby Enola AirdThe Motherhood ProjectDecember 31st, 2006The Motherhood Project interviews CGS's Associate Executive Director on a wide range of human biotechnology issues.
Mamma Mia! 'Infertility,' the MusicalNewsweekDecember 5th, 2005"Almost three decades after the birth of the world's first test-tube baby, infertility is not only out of the closet, it's kicking up its heels off-Broadway."
Human Biotechnology in Art & Culture: A ListAugust 1st, 2004A list of examples of modern artistic and cultural work addressing or incorporating the new human genetic technologies.
Summer ReadingGenetic CrossroadsJune 9th, 2003The mini-reviews here represent a sampling of recent works focused on the technologies and ideologies that could push us into a "post-human" era.
Twist and Shout!The Double Helix Replicates Itself in Popular Cultureby Amy HarmonNew York TimesFebruary 25th, 2003Since the discovery of the double helix 50 years ago unlocked the molecular secret of life, the popular imagination has been busily sequencing its own meaning from the ultimate scientific symbol. As scientists rush to decipher the way genes express their biological functions, the public's hopes and fears about the power of DNA have found expression in forms both prosaic and profound.
Opera Addresses New Human Genetic TechnologiesGenetic CrossroadsSeptember 18th, 2002The San Francisco Opera hosted a read-through of a newly commissioned opera, Earthrise, which explores the unknown consequences of human cloning and genetic manipulation by depicting a conversation between a retiring lab scientist and her "replicants."
French Best-Selling Novel Celebrates a Post-Human FutureGenetic CrossroadsJanuary 7th, 2001The new literary-artistic embrace of the techno-eugenic vision continues with publication in English of the 1998 French bestseller The Elementary Particles by Michel Houellebecq.
Eduardo Kac on Transgenic Animals as ArtGenetic CrossroadsJanuary 7th, 2001Kac is a Chicago Art Institute professor who persuaded French geneticists to produce a rabbit that glows in the dark by injecting rabbit zygotes with a fluorescent protein gene derived from jellyfish.
Art Exhibits on BiotechnologyGenetic CrossroadsOctober 16th, 2000Current and planned art exhibits focusing on human biotechnology.
News Stories about Tinkering with DNA Miss the Big PictureGlowing Rabbit Shows We're Creeping Toward Redesigning Human Lifeby Tom Abate San Francisco ChronicleSeptember 25th, 2000

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