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About Other Countries' Policies & Human Biotechnology


The United Kingdom

Countries differ widely in the types of human biotechnologies they regulate, the jurisdiction of authority, the nature of enforcement, and other particulars. One requirement for effective policy is a government agency responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. Frequently cited models are Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act and the United Kingdom’s Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA).

Many countries have considered prohibiting the most troubling applications: human reproductive cloning and inheritable genetic modification. To date, they are illegal in nearly 50 countries. Similar legislation is pending in other nations.



Egg-Freeze Unadvised, Panel SaysJapan TimesFebruary 26th, 2015A panel under the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology will not recommend that young and healthy women preserve their frozen eggs for future pregnancy, citing the health risks and relatively low pregnancy rate.
Thailand Bans Commercial Surrogacy for ForeignersBBCFebruary 20th, 2015Thailand has passed a law banning foreigners from paying Thai women to be surrogates, after two high-profile cases sparked debate last year.
A primer on DNA forensicsby Blair CrawfordOttawa CitizenFebruary 18th, 2015Improved technology and automation means DNA profiles can now be done in a matter of days and, in the future, the wait could be reduced to just hours. But DNA evidence is hardly infallible.
Les Vertiges Du Transhumanisme[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky and Pete Shanks]by Corine LesnesLe MondeFebruary 12th, 2015"They're selling us technology as if it were a total blessing, but the result could well be that what we take for high-tech marvels are in fact the instrument of power exercised by a few over the rest of us."
Gay Couple Stuck in Mexican Legal Limbo After Birth of Surrogate Twinsby Verónica CalderónEl PaisFebruary 12th, 2015They cannot secure passports for their children, given that the state of Tabasco recognizes surrogate births, while the government department responsible for Mexican passport applications does not.
It's Illegal to Pay a Surrogate Mother in Canada. So What Would Motivate a Woman to do it? by Denise BalkissoonThe Globe and MailFebruary 12th, 2015They show a curious mix of altruism and omnipotence: These are women who give up their very bodies for complete strangers, but only after choosing a lucky few from the desperate hordes.
Court Grants Kids Right to Know Donor FathersThe Local [Germany]January 29th, 2015The Supreme Court has decided that the children of sperm donors have a right to know who their biological father is at any time.
China Says Its Gender Imbalance "Most Serious" in the World by Reuters staffScientific AmericanJanuary 22nd, 2015The National Health and Family Planning Commission said it would step up supervision on fetal sex determination, which is banned in China.
After Canada, UK, 23andMe Wants DNA Test Growth Abroadby Caroline Humer and Christina FarrReutersJanuary 15th, 2015The company, whose consumer-directed tests were barred by U.S. health regulators in 2013, said Western Europe is one focus for expansion.
Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests Should Come With a Health Warningby Jessica CussinsThe Pharmaceutical JournalJanuary 15th, 2015Genetic testing is appropriate in certain situations, but for healthy people as a way to predict disease, it is imprecise and comes with a number of risks.
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