Home Overview Press Room Blog Publications For Students about us
Search

About Other Countries' Policies & Human Biotechnology


The United Kingdom

Countries differ widely in the types of human biotechnologies they regulate, the jurisdiction of authority, the nature of enforcement, and other particulars. One requirement for effective policy is a government agency responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. Frequently cited models are Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act and the United Kingdom’s Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA).

Many countries have considered prohibiting the most troubling applications: human reproductive cloning and inheritable genetic modification. To date, they are illegal in nearly 50 countries. Similar legislation is pending in other nations.



China Says Its Gender Imbalance "Most Serious" in the World by Reuters staffScientific AmericanJanuary 22nd, 2015The National Health and Family Planning Commission said it would step up supervision on fetal sex determination, which is banned in China.
After Canada, UK, 23andMe Wants DNA Test Growth Abroadby Caroline Humer and Christina FarrReutersJanuary 15th, 2015The company, whose consumer-directed tests were barred by U.S. health regulators in 2013, said Western Europe is one focus for expansion.
Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests Should Come With a Health Warningby Jessica CussinsThe Pharmaceutical JournalJanuary 15th, 2015Genetic testing is appropriate in certain situations, but for healthy people as a way to predict disease, it is imprecise and comes with a number of risks.
Surrogate Moms Sue Thai Ministry for Custody of 13 ChildrenAssociated PressJanuary 14th, 2015The surrogate mothers of 13 babies fathered by a Japanese businessman are suing Thai authorities and seeking to regain custody of the children.
Trying to Tame the Wild West of Surrogacy in Indiaby Raksha KumarAlJazeera AmericaJanuary 14th, 2015Carrying someone else's baby is a $400 million industry here, but there are still no laws to protect women working as surrogate mothers.
IVF Booster Offered in Canada But Not US[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Alison MotlukCanadian Medical Association JournalJanuary 14th, 2015A fertility treatment that purports to help older women get pregnant by using mitochondria from their own ovarian stem cells is now being offered in Toronto, but nowhere else in North America.
Stem Cell Bill to Thwart False ClaimsBangkok PostJanuary 10th, 2015In Thailand, stem cell treatment is allowed only for leukaemia and thalassaemia. But several clinics with unlicensed practitioners promote wild claims to customers.
How the Rise of Commercial Surrogacy is Turning Babies into Commoditiesby Clair AchmadThe ConversationDecember 25th, 2014This year the international spotlight turned with full force on cross-border commercial surrogacy.
Commercialized Conception Casualties: "Brave" Baby Making?by Mirah RibenHuffington PostDecember 22nd, 2014Hiring surrogates and purchasing sperm, eggs, or others' leftover frozen embryos have become accepted as choices on a menu of options.
The Hidden Costs of International Surrogacyby Darlena CunhaThe AtlanticDecember 22nd, 2014Overseas options look cheaper on paper, but they don't account for fraud, travel costs, and legal headaches that inevitably arise.
Displaying 1-10 of 598  
Next >> 
Last Page » 
« Show Complete List » 


ESPAÑOL | PORTUGUÊS | Русский

home | overview | blog | publications| about us | donate | newsletter | press room | privacy policy

CGS • 1936 University Ave, Suite 350, Berkeley, CA 94704 • • (p) 1.510.665.7760 • (F) 1.510.665.8760