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About Egg Retrieval


Scientists working to perform research cloning require large numbers of women's eggs for their efforts. Egg retrieval is invasive, time-consuming, uncomfortable, andómost importantóputs women at risk of significant adverse reactions.

In order to procure eggs, researchers give women hormonal drugs to first "shut down" and then "hyperstimulate" their ovaries to produce more eggs than normal. These eggs are then surgically extracted.

Egg retrieval for assisted reproduction has been conducted for several decades, but there is inadequate data on its risks. Follow-up studies on long-term risks are particularly lacking; those that do exist are inconclusive.

Short-term reactions to one commonly used "shut-down" drug include severe joint pain, difficulty breathing, chest pain, depression, amnesia, hypertension, and asthma. The drugs used to stimulate multiple egg production can cause ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), which is often a mild reaction but which can become serious enough to require hospitalization and, rarely, to cause death.

Some women's health advocates and others have questioned whether researchers should ask women to expose themselves to these risks, especially in light of the early and speculative stage of cloning research. Proposals to pay women to provide eggs for research remain controversial, as this practice could tempt economically vulnerable women to take risks they otherwise would avoid.



Egg-Freeze Unadvised, Panel SaysJapan TimesFebruary 26th, 2015A panel under the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology will not recommend that young and healthy women preserve their frozen eggs for future pregnancy, citing the health risks and relatively low pregnancy rate.
Blog: Three Parent IVFby Dr Trevor StammersSt Maryís University BlogFebruary 16th, 2015At our current stage of understanding of the interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, this proposed new therapy could turn out to be a monstrous mistake.
Top 10 Myths About 3-Person IVF Mitochondrial Transferby Paul KnoepflerKnoepfler Lab Stem Cell BlogFebruary 10th, 2015Although well-intentioned, this technology could end up doing far more harm than good, especially if implemented too soon.
Egg-Freezing? Put Flex Time, Daycare Firstby Jacqueline NelsonThe Globe and MailFebruary 8th, 2015What exactly do we expect women to do to their bodies to become the ideal employee?
Buying Time: How Egg Freezing has Moved into the Mainstreamby Carly WeeksThe Globe and MailFebruary 8th, 2015There are questions about what exactly women are buying. Donít expect to find the answers in the waiting-room pamphlets of fertility clinics.
UK Set to Legalize Babies With DNA From 3 Parents[With CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]KQED RadioFebruary 6th, 2015Bay Area public radio discusses the technology and whether the U.S. and other countries may follow Britain's lead.
Breaking Down The Science Of '3-Parent Babies'[With CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Alyona MinkovskiHuffPost LiveFebruary 4th, 2015The U.K. has approved creating babies with the DNA of three different people. We break down the pros, cons and controversy.
U.K. Parliament Approves Controversial Three-Parent Mitochondrial Gene Therapy[With CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Gretchen Vogel and Erik StokstadScienceFebruary 3rd, 2015Despite warnings from scientists, the United Kingdomís House of Commons voted to allow British researchers to pursue a new fertility treatment that could prevent certain kinds of genetic diseases.
A Week After Welcoming the Twins She Longed for, Mom, 56, Dies[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Beth GreenfieldYahoo ParentingJanuary 28th, 2015The tragic death highlights the increased risks faced by women, especially older women, who more and more are using assisted reproductive technologies to push the boundaries of fertility.
Egg Donor Loses Case Against IRS, Must Pay Taxes on Earningsby Richard RubinBloombergJanuary 22nd, 2015The U.S. Tax Court rejected a California womanís attempt to avoid taxes on the $20,000 she received when she provided her eggs for use by infertile couples.
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